Dec 03, 2020  
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 
    
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Music

  
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    MUS 106 - Introduction to the Music Business

    3

    An introduction to the business side of the music industry, topics will include record companies, artist management, music publishing, radio, and the Internet. We will examine contemporary practices and their historical backgrounds. Career opportunities will also be discussed. As a final project, students will have the opportunity to work out a marketing plan for their own musical ventures or for an MCC-sponsored musical event.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 110 - Music Theory I

    3



    Music Theory I introduces students to fundamental elements of music: pitch, rhythm, and harmonic structure.  Students develop the skills of musical notation as well as recognizing and writing intervals, scales and chords. There is also some work with ear training, (aural recognition and oral reproduction of melody and rhythms.).

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 120 - Introduction to Music Technology

    3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the various ways that technology influences music production and performance. Topics to be covered will include basic computer/Internet skills, digital audio, basic acoustics and music synthesis, MIDI, sequencing, and music notation. Students will acquire skills by completing independent projects utilizing various music software applications in the electronic music lab.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 130 - Applied Piano For Beginners

    3



    This course will help the student acquire the basic skills necessary to play the piano, such as reading music, understanding rhythm, coordinating both hands, and phrasing.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 131 - Applied Guitar for Beginners

    3

    The course will begin with classical-style finger picking, tone production, sight-reading and tuning techniques. Students will learn both plectrum and finger-style strumming techniques, and will play basic jazz, pop and blues chord progressions. Chord theory and symbol notation will be explained, and the course will conclude with the introduction to basic arranging techniques. Students will complete a performance project. Periodic in-class performances will be required. Students must have an acoustic guitar.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 132 - Voice I

    3



    For anyone who enjoys singing, this course covers vocal technique, including breathing, tone and vocal production, and interpretation and performance practices.  Students sing songs from the classical literature as well as popular tunes.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 134 - World Drumming

    3

    This course will explore the realm of percussion from a variety of perspectives incorporating both history and practice. We will look at the historical development of percussion and percussion instruments as well as their use in various cultural traditions, not only in western classical music but in the music of indigenous peoples throughout the world. We will also look at the way those traditions have influenced one another to shape the use of percussion today. The performance aspect of this course will focus on the basic percussion rudiments and building technique for performance. Students may work in groups and individually on percussion exercises and repertoire. This course is designed to be informative for students of any background and is open to all students regardless of ability.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 160 - Music Theory II

    3

    A continuation of MUS 110. An intermediate course of music theory, including the study of chord progressions, figured bass, and the harmonization of melodies.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 110; or permission of course instructor.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 170 - Music Technology II

    3

    This course is designed for students who already possess a basic understanding of the important concepts of digital audio editing, MIDI, and synthesis. Music Technology II will allow students to explore audio recording/production techniques, classic electronic synthesis, digital processing, and electronic composition in depth. Students will create electronic music projects in the Music Technology Lab that are designed to utilize a variety of software and hardware to enhance the students’ technique as well as to increase understanding of the increasingly prominent role that technology plays in the music of our time. Students will be required to commit to at least one hour of lab time per week in addition to the scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 120; or permission of course instructor.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 180 - Beginning Piano II

    3

    A continuation of Applied Piano for Beginners

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 130.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 181 - Guitar II

    3

    A continuation of the skills learned in Applied Guitar for Beginners. Upon entering this class students must have established basic fingerpicking and plectrum techniques and be able to read in the 1st position. Sight-reading will be reviewed and expanded to the 2nd and 5th positions of the guitar. Rock, jazz and blues improvisational techniques will be studied using modes, minor scales, pentatonic scales, blues scales, arpeggios and memorized patterns. Chord symbols and chord progressions will be studied in detail. Ensemble playing, ear-training and advanced rhythmic skills will be focused on throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 131.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): Acoustic and electric guitars welcome.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 182 - Voice II

    3

    A continuation of MUS 132.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 132.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 184 - World Drumming

    3



    This continuation course will explore the realm of percussion from many perspectives incorporating history, cultural traditions, influences and practice. Students in this second semester course will be assigned a research project.  The performance aspects of this course will focus on improving basic percussion rudiments acquired in the first semester.  Improvisation and group interaction will be explored. The class will work towards a final group performance (required) near the end of the semester.


    Students will be able to:


    * Analyze the written language of music through the multi-step process of considering the time signature and basic rhythms.
    * Demonstrate the ability to work (practice) consistently away from the college on their own–  every day, as well as to demonstrate the ability to focus on the task at hand both during the practice sessions at home and during class time lessons and practice.
    * Control nervousness so that they can perform in front of the class and in the final group performance
    * Create written documents that employ Standard English spelling, grammar, punctuation and capitalization.
    * Identify rhythms in music from various regions in the world and compare and contrast percussion music from different countries

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 134
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities and Music Elective


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 230 - Piano III

    3

    A continuation of Beginning Piano II.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 130 and MUS 180.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 241 - Guitar Ensemble

    1

    Students join Guitar I for the rehearsal portion of the class.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUS 131 and MUS 181; or permission of course instructor.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    MUS 280 - Piano IV

    3

    A continuation of Beginning Piano III.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 130, MUS 180 and MUS 230
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Nursing

  
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    NUR 080 - LPN/ADRN Transition

    1



    In this course the student will explore the role change from licensed practical nurse to associate degree nursing student. The focus is on the application of the nursing process to specific skills required for the student who qualifies to advance-place into NUR 155/156* or for the graduate of an articulating LPN program who qualifies to enter NUR 205/206.

     

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the Core Competencies© of the Registered Nurse.
    • Differentiate between the various roles of the nursing health care team members.
    • Apply basic concepts of evidence-based practice to the care of the patient.
    • Apply principles of effective communication.
    • Demonstrate competence in specified nursing skills.
    • Calculate safe drug dosages.


    Note(s): Hybrid format
    Enrollment is limited to readmitted nursing students or Licensed Practical Nurses who have been accepted into the Middlesex Community College Nursing Program.

    *To advance-place into NUR 155/156 the student must also pass the NLN-ACE PN-RN exam. Exemption credit. (15 hours)


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 101 - Fundamentals Of Nursing

    5



    In this course the student is introduced to the basic knowledge, attitudes, and skills of the professional nurse. The Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies© provide the framework for this course, where the focus is on patient-centered care, safety, evidence-based practice, professionalism, teamwork, and communication.  Clinical application of the Fundamentals of Nursing theory course includes a laboratory and a direct care component.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care.
    • Explain human factors and basic design principles that affect safety.
    • Describe the concept of evidence-based practice.
    • List the attributes of professionalism.
    • Describe the roles of the interdisciplinary and nursing health care team members.
    • Identify principles of effective communication.


    Corequisite(s): ENG 101, BIO 231, PSY 101, NUR 102
    Note(s): NUR 102 must be taken concurrently with NUR 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 102 - Fundamentals Of Nursing Practicum

    3



    Clinical application of the Fundamentals of Nursing theory course includes a laboratory, simulation, and a direct care component.

    Opportunities to learn and practice selected basic skills of a professional nurse are provided in lab experiences; here the student can critically examine development of his/her psychomotor, communication, and decision-making skills.

    The student has opportunities to apply Core Competencies© to the care of adult clients, at various functional levels, in the long-term care and sub-acute care environments.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Apply the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care to the care of the patient.
    • Provide safe, effective care in the long-term and sub-acute settings.
    • Apply basic concepts of evidence-based practice to the care of the patient.
    • Demonstrate the beginning attributes of professionalism in the care setting.
    • Apply principles of effective communicate during interactions with the patient and health care team.


    Corequisite(s): ENG 101, BIO 231, PSY 101, NUR 101
    Note(s): NUR 101 must be taken concurrently with NUR 102.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 103 - Freshman Lab



    During Freshman Lab, students are taught required skills basic to nursing practice. Opportunities for student practice are provided.

    Note(s): NUR 102 must be taken concurrently with NUR 103.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 155 - Intergenerational Nursing

    5



    In this course the student continues to develop the Core Competencies© of the professional nurse as the theoretical content builds upon the Fundamental of Nursing course curriculum.  The focus is on patient-centered care, safety, evidence-based practice, professionalism, teamwork, and communication as the competencies apply to care of families and groups across the lifespan that is appropriate and respectful of the client’s development stage.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care across the lifespan.
    • Explain human factors and basic safety design principles that affect safety across the lifespan.
    • Describe the concept of evidence-based practice as it applies to care across the lifespan.
    • Explain the attributes of professionalism.
    • Describe the roles of the interdisciplinary health care team as they relate to care across the lifespan.
    • Identify principles of effective communication with patients and family systems.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 101, NUR 102, ENG 101, PSY 101, and BIO 231.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 232, ANT 101, NUR 156, NUR 160
    Note(s): NUR 156 must be taken concurrently with NUR 155. Open to Nursing students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 156 - Intergenerational Nursing Practicum

    4



    Clinical application of the Intergenerational Nursing theory course includes a laboratory, simulation, and a direct care component.

    Opportunities to learn and practice selected progressive skills of a professional nurse are provided in lab experiences; here the student can critically examine development of his/her psychomotor, communication, and decision-making skills.

    The student has opportunities to apply Core Competencies© to the care of patient and family systems in the Maternity, Pediatric, and Gerontological care settings.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Apply the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care to the care of the patient in the Maternity, Pediatric, and Gerontological care settings.
    • Provide safe, effective care in the Maternity, Pediatric, and Gerontological care settings.
    • Apply basic concepts of evidence-based practice to make practice decisions.
    • Demonstrate the developing attributes of professionalism in the care setting.
    • Apply principles of effective, developmentally appropriate communication during interactions with the patient and interdisciplinary health care team.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 101, NUR 102, ENG 101, PSY 101, and BIO 231.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 232, ANT 101, NUR 155, NUR 160
    Note(s): NUR 155 must be taken concurrently with NUR 156. Open to Nursing students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 160 - Pharmacology for Nurses

    3



    In this course the student is introduced to the concepts of basic pharmacology and the role of the nurse in the management of drug therapy. The main focus is on the Core Competencies© of patient-centered care, safety, communication, evidence-based practice, and system-based practice. Physical, biological, psychosocial, cultural, intellectual, spiritual, and environmental factors that influence drug therapy are stressed as they apply to administration of medication and safe patient care. 

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the multi-dimensions of patient-centered care that influence safe drug therapies.
    • Describe the mechanisms of action, drug effects, therapeutic uses, side effects, adverse effects, interactions, and nursing implications for specific drug classifications.
    • Calculate safe drug dosages.
    • Explain the roles of the professional nurse and the health care team as they relate to safe drug therapy and administration. 
    • Apply the components of the nursing process to the safe administration of medications.
    • Apply the best current evidence to make practice decisions related to drug therapy.
    • Apply principles of effective communication when educating clients about drug therapy.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 101, NUR 102, ENG 101, PSY 101, and BIO 231.
    Corequisite(s): NUR 155, NUR 156, BIO 232, ANT 101
    Note(s): Open to Nursing students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 205 - Nursing Care of the Adult I

    4



    In this course the student begins to integrate knowledge of medical/surgical and bio-psycho-social nursing concepts into the holistic perspective of patient-centered care.  The focus is on the continued development and integration of the Core Competencies© of the professional nurse as they apply to the adult client with common acute and chronic/persistent physical and/or mental health problems.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care for patients with medical/surgical and mental health problems. 
    • Apply safety design principles to the care of patients with medical/surgical and mental health problems. 
    • Model the attributes of professionalism.
    • Analyze the concept of evidence-based practice as it applies to care of patients with medical/surgical and mental health problems. 
    • Examine the roles of the interdisciplinary health care team as they relate to care of patients with medical/surgical and mental health problems.
    • Use effective communication to foster mutual respect and team learning.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 155, NUR 156, NUR 160, BIO 232, and ANT 101.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 235, MAT 177, NUR 206
    Note(s): NUR 206 must be taken concurrently with NUR 205.;Open to Nursing students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 206 - Nursing Care of Adult I Practicum

    5



    Clinical application of the Nursing Care of the Adult I theory course includes a laboratory, simulation, and a direct care component. Opportunities to learn and practice selected complex skills of a professional nurse are provided in lab experiences; here the student can critically examine development of his/her psychomotor, communication, and decision-making skills. The student has the opportunity to apply Core Competencies© to the care of patient with medical/surgical and mental health problems.  

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Apply the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care to the holistic and coordinated care of the patient with medical/surgical and mental health problems.  
    • Minimize risk of harm to patients and providers through both system effectiveness and individual performance in the medical/surgical and mental health settings.
    • Use leadership skills to facilitate the achievement of shared goals.
    • Analyze the best current evidence coupled with clinical competence to make practice decisions.
    • Use advanced technology in order to make decisions that optimize patient outcomes in the medical/surgical and mental health settings.
    • Interact effectively with patients, families, and the health care team to enhance health outcomes.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 155, NUR 156, NUR 160, BIO 232, and ANT 101.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 235, MAT 177, NUR 205
    Note(s): NUR 205 must be taken concurrently with NUR 206. Open to Nursing students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 255 - Nursing Care of the Adult II

    4



    In this course the student continues to develop and become proficient in the Core Competencies© related to the comprehensive care of adult clients, families, groups, and communities with complex acute or chronic/persistent health problems. Additional focus is on the competencies related to beginning leadership, management, and collaboration skills within a variety of health systems.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Identify the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care for patients and communities with medical/surgical and public health problems.
    • Apply safety design principles to the care of patients with medical/surgical and mental health problems. 
    • Model the attributes of professionalism.
    • Analyze the concept of evidence-based practice as it applies to care of patients with medical/surgical and public health problems.
    • Use leadership and management skills to influence the behaviors of individuals and groups to achieve shared goals.
    • Examine the roles of the interdisciplinary health care team as they relate to care of patients with medical/surgical and public health problems.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 205, NUR 206, BIO 235 and MAT 177.
    Corequisite(s): ENG 102, NUR 256, Humanities elective.
    Note(s): NUR 256 must be taken concurrently with NUR 255.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 256 - Nursing Care of Adult II Practicum

    5



    Clinical application of the Nursing Care of the Adult II theory course includes simulation and a direct care component. In the Nursing Care of the Adult II Practicum, the student continues to develop and become proficient in the Core Competencies© related to the comprehensive care of adult clients, families, groups, and communities with complex acute or chronic/persistent health problems in the medical surgical setting.  Competencies related to leadership/management are the focus of the clinical experiences in transitional care and community settings. 

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Apply the multiple dimensions of patient-centered care to the comprehensive care of the patient with complex medical/surgical problems.
    • Minimize risk of harm to patients and providers through system effectiveness and individual performance in a variety of complex healthcare settings. 
    • Use leadership skills to influence the behaviors of individuals and groups to achieve shared goals in a variety of settings. 
    • Analyze the best current evidence coupled with clinical competence to make practice decisions.
    • Use advanced technology in order to make decisions that optimize patient outcomes in the medical/surgical, community, and long-term care settings.
    • Interact effectively with patients, families, communities, and the health care team to enhance health outcomes.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 205, NUR 206, BIO 235 and MAT 177.
    Corequisite(s): ENG 102, NUR 256, Humanities elective.
    Note(s): NUR 255 must be taken concurrently with NUR 256.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NUR 260 - Nursing Issues

    1



    In this course the student will explore concepts, trends, and professional behaviors that affect current nursing practice. The focus is on the Core Competencies© of professionalism, communication, and teamwork/collaboration as students prepare to transition into the workforce.

    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • Incorporate the multi-dimensions of professionalism into nursing practice.
    • Analyze the impact of local and global trends/resources on quality patient care.
    • Assess the role of evidence in supporting healthcare decisions and practices.
    • Use effective communication to foster mutual respect, team learning, and professional development.
    • Create a personal philosophy of nursing that incorporates the Core Competencies©.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NUR 205, NUR 206, BIO 235 and MAT 177.
    Corequisite(s): ENG 102, NUR 256, Humanities elective.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Paralegal

  
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    PAR 102 - Litigation

    3

    This course explores how the court system is used to resolve disputes. It emphasizes litigation that does not involve criminal conduct. Topics will include jurisdiction, substantive and procedural laws, investigation, and preparation of the lawsuit. The class will pay particular attention to the practical aspects of how a paralegal assists a lawyer in the variety of tasks essential to the litigation process.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a required course for all paralegal majors.
    This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 110 - Legal Research and Writing I

    3

    This course provides an introduction to legal research techniques and writing. It will examine the importance as well as the limitations of legal research and the law library. Emphasis is placed on development of the skills required to research a problem in terms of background, specific fact, and validation. The fundamentals of legal writing are presented through preparation of research and memoranda. Students will use WESTLAW and LEXIS-NEXIS during this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a required course for all paralegal majors.
    This is a Legal Speciality course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 130 - Business Organizations

    3

    This course is designed to provide training in the practical aspects of the law of business organizations. It begins with the most simple form of business enterprise, the sole proprietorship, progresses through general partnerships and limited partnerships, and dwells upon the most complex business organization, the corporation. Corporate materials are discussed chronologically as they will usually be met in practice. Corporate characteristics, formation procedures, financial structure, meetings, dividends, share ownership, amendments, and dissolution are discussed in depth.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 131 - Computer Applications For Paralegals

    3

    This course will introduce the paralegal to computer applications as they are used in a law firm, corporation or other legal setting. Topics will include the explanation and illustration of computer hardware, software and peripherals. Students will be introduced to various legal software packages, including word processing, spreadsheets, database management, PowerPoint presentation, timekeeping and billing, litigation support, and more.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 132 - Contract Law

    3

    This course provides an introduction to general contract law concepts and the Uniform Commercial Code. The basics of creating a contract offer and acceptance, consideration, capacity, legality are studied, as are the means by which contracts are terminated and disputes are handled. Topics include purchase and sale agreements, security agreements, basic financing, consumer protection, and the purchase and sale of corporate assets and securities.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 133 - Criminal Law for the Paralegal

    3

    This course examines criminal law and procedure, emphasizing Massachusetts and federal law. The categories of crime, as well as the requisites for crime and criminal defenses, are introduced. The class will pay particular attention to the practical aspects of how a paralegal assists a lawyer in a variety of tasks.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 134 - Family Law

    3

    This course will examine the relationship between families and the law. Topics will include: the legal definitions of marriage and family; the rights and obligations among family members, including parent-child relationships, divorce, property division, alimony, child custody and child support; and the government’s role in marriage and family life.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 135 - Real Estate Law

    3

    This course provides an overview of the principles of real estate law. Modern-day estates in land and types of ownership will be discussed, including fee simple, joint tenancy and condominium law. Real estate documents will be introduced in the order in which they are met in a typical single-family real estate closing, including the offer, the purchase-and-sale agreement, notes and mortgages, types of financing arrangements, title examinations, title insurance documents, settlement statements and more. Foreclosure law will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 136 - Wills, Trusts and Estates

    3

    The first part of this course deals with the procedures and substantive law of wills and administration of estates and trusts. Civil commitment, guardianship, and conservatorship will also be discussed. An overview of federal and Massachusetts estate and gift tax procedures will be included.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 198 - Law Office Management

    3

    Attorneys are relying more often upon paralegals to assist with daily law office management functions as well as long-range systems planning. Upon completion of this course the student will be equipped to assist practicing attorneys in the effective management of their law offices. Adhering to the guidelines provided by the American Association for Paralegal Education this course will cover: how law offices are legally structured; the law office/ client relationship; legal and ethical concepts affecting law office management; administrative systems including fees, time-keeping and billing systems; management of clients’ trust fund accounts; marketing and strategic planning; law library organization and management; document preparation; docket control and other relevant management topics. Administrative skills such as leadership, communication, delegation and personnel issues will be addressed, and typical law office situations will be presented for analysis. This course is offered as an alternative to PAR 199, the Paralegal Internship and only one of these courses may be taken for program credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PAR 110.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 199 - Paralegal Internship

    3

    The internship program provides a supervised practicum experience in law. Interns will spend 6 hours per week at their assigned internship position and attend a weekly one-hour seminar at the college. Weekly classes will review law office procedures, employability skills, ethical issues in the legal workplace, and selected topics in law. Students may be assigned to criminal or civil areas of law. All interns will be supervised by attorneys and will be responsible for performing work traditionally assigned to paralegals such as researching state and federal law (statutes, regulations and cases), responding to client requests for information, and coordinating responses to public agencies and private law firms. Internship opportunities exist within the MCC Law Center, the district courts, and law offices approved by the program director. This course is strongly recommended for all students planning to seek paralegal employment upon graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PAR 110.
    Note(s): This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PAR 210 - Legal Research and Writing II

    3

    Building on students’ research skills, this course requires independent research of a legal issue using online sources and research methods. Students prepare written materials including a memorandum analyzing a legal issue. Emphasis is placed on developing organized research methodology using the most current online sources available, developing an analytical writing style, and on editing for clarity and conciseness.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 and PAR 110.
    Note(s): This is a required course for all Paralegal Studies majors.
    This is a Legal Specialty course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Philosophy

  
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    PHL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy

    3



    An introductory study of traditional and contemporary philosophies and an analysis of how their ideas apply to living today. Students in the course explore such issues as: the meaning and purpose of life, the nature of religious belief, the justification of moral values, and the meaning of human freedom.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHL 107 - Eastern Philosophy

    3

    An introductory study of major systems and themes of Eastern thought generally focused on Confucianism but may include comparative studies in Buddhism, Daoism, Hinduism and Islam. The history and cultural practices of these traditions will be explored through a study of their rituals and social/ethical beliefs by way of translated texts.

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHL 108 - Applied Ethics in Dental Hygiene

    3

    This course is designed to introduce students to applied ethics in the dental hygiene profession. The student will apply rational standards for evaluation of ethical dilemmas that arise in practice. The course will address standards for ethical, legal and professional responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of DHY 200
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Physics

  
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    PHY 105 - Astronomy

    3

    A descriptive course designed to introduce students to solar system and deep-space phenomena. Extensive use is made of hands-on activities to aid in understanding the relationship of the Earth to the sun, moon, and other planets, along with tides, time, and eclipses. Emphasis is placed upon gaining insights into the size and scale of the solar system, galaxy, and cosmos. Additional topics include stellar evolution, dynamics of the Milky Way and other galaxies, the search for extraterrestrial life, and cosmology. Nighttime sky viewing is included, with and without the telescope.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHY 110 - Physics for Networking Systems

    3

    Designed for CSNT students. The physics of data transfer via various media is emphasized. Topics include vectors, motion, force, work and energy, wave motion, light, diffraction, polarization, reflection, refraction, and propagation properties of various media (e.g., wire, cable, fiber, free space). Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, and others are practiced.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in NST 101, NST 111 and TMA 096
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHY 151 - Physics I

    4

    The first in a two-semester algebra/trigonometry-based physics sequence. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving. Topics include the metric system, kinematics, Newton’s laws, momentum, energy, power, rotation, buoyancy and simple harmonic motion 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; eligible for MAT 195
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHY 152 - Physics II

    4

    A continuation of PHY 151. The basic principles of sound, light, electromagnetism, and radioactivity are considered. Special topics include the Doppler effect, wave theory, and heat. 3 hour lecture/2 hour laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 151 with a grade of C or better or permission of a Science instructor
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHY 171 - Physics For Engineering And Science I

    4



    The first in a series of two calculus-based physics courses for students planning to transfer to an engineering or physical science baccalaureate program. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving. Topics include the SI system; kinematics in one, two and three dimensions; Newton’s laws of motion; friction, circular motion, conservation of energy and momentum, and oscillations. 3 hours lecture/ 3 hours laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MAT 290.
    Recommendation(s): Previous high school or college physics is strongly recommended.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PHY 172 - Physics For Engineering And Science II

    4

    The second in a sequence of two calculus-based physics courses for students planning to transfer to an engineering or physical science baccalaureate program. Topics include waves, electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and an introduction to modern physics. 3 hour lecture/3 hour laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 171 with a grade of C or better and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MAT 291.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Psychology

  
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    PSY 100 - Explorations in Human Behavior

    3



    This course focuses on how psychology can help us meet the demands and challenges of living in a complex society. Topics such as theories of personality and motivation, personal growth and adjustment, interpersonal relationships and decision making and values will be explored. This course is hands-on, stresses learning by doing and will integrate learning strategies, study skills and information on college resources that contribute to college success. Specifically designed for students who have had minimal previous experience with behavioral science, not for those who have completed PSY 101.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 092, ENG 093 or ENG 099.
    Recommendation(s): Eligible for ENG 092, ENG 093 or ENG 099, if CPT is between 44 and 55, is encouraged.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): Students eligible for ENG 101 are not eligible to enroll in the course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 101 - Introduction To Psychology

    3



    An introduction to the study of how people behave and function. Topics covered include: physiology of the brain, memory, learning, language, perception, life span changes, normality and abnormality, social interactions, group influence on individuals, and therapies.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 108 - Creative Thinking

    3



    This interdisciplinary course will increase students’ understanding of the nature of creativity and creative problem solving. It provides students with an introduction to skills and techniques designed to increase their creativity and ability to develop innovative solutions to meaningful problems. Students will analyze the creative process from a variety of theoretical perspectives and participate in activities that develop capacities to generate original ideas. Topics include modern theories of creativity from psychology and allied fields, environments that enhance creative functioning, techniques to promote divergent thinking, and case studies of creative individuals. A variety of critical and creative thinking skills designed to boost creativity will be explored and practiced. Knowledge and skills gained in this course are applicable to solving business, scientific, and environmental problems, as well as the arts and sciences and othe areas of personal interest.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 120 - Child Psychology

    3



    This course examines critical issues in physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development from the prenatal period to early adolescence. Emphasis is on the sequence and meanings of developmental patterns in the life of a child. The course provides a framework by which students may better observe and understand the world of childhood.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 121 - Adolescent Psychology

    3

    This course will focus on the physiological, cognitive, social, and emotional changes of adolescence that lead to both a new sense of self and new responsibilities in the social world. Emphasis is on the influence of life events on the identity process. Topics include puberty and sexual behavior, moral and values development, the influence of peers and school, and delinquency and violence.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 122 - Child Growth and Development

    3



    An examination of the development of children from pre-birth through puberty. Utilizing both theoretical and practical perspectives, the physical, cognitive, and social, personality and emotional development of children will be explored, with an emphasis on the interrelationships between theory, research and practice. Also considered are such topics as the critical role for adults in fostering all areas of children’s growth, and the significant influence of family and culture on development. This course is especially designed for students interested in pursuing course work or careers in education, nursing and human services.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 123 - Developmental Disabilities

    3



    This course offers an introduction to a broad range of developmental disabilities and related topics, including categories of cognitive, physical, emotional, and learning delays. The inclusion of children and adults into educational and community environments will be highlighted. Topics include the history of special education, the impact of the family, current and future trends, early intervention, transition, and the laws which govern the integration of children and adults in society. All students are required to complete a 22-hour service-learning placement in a setting serving children or adults with developmental disabilities.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 125 - Psychology of Success

    3

    What does it mean to be successful? What do we personally contribute to our success? Is success the same in our personal lives, at work, and at school? Can the factors that bring us success in one aspect of our lives be utilized in another area? This course is designed to help students create greater success in college and in life. Students will learn to apply relevant psychological concepts and theories such as motivation, learning, memory, positive psychology and college student development to gain more control over outcomes and experiences in college and in life. In addition, students will be introduced to and given multiple opportunities to develop competency in MCC’s Core Student Success Skills (CSSS): critical thinking, communication, collaboration, organization, and self-assessment to help sharpen skills that contribute to college success. Using guided journal writings, class activities, and focused conversations, students will explore success strategies to achieve their personal goals. Through application of the success strategies, students will learn to improve their life outcomes - academically, professionally and personally.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): Required for and limited to students placed on Academic Probation.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 127 - Human Sexuality

    3

    This course examines the biological, psychosocial, and attitudinal aspects of human sexuality with particular emphasis on the socio-psychological dimension. Topics include sexual anatomy, conception and birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, the development of sexuality and forms of sexual expression, sexual identity, homosexuality, and sexual dysfunction and its treatment.

    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 135 - Windows on the World: Social Psychology Explored through the Humanities

    3

    This unique course integrates theories of social psychology, humanities and the arts. Research and theories from social psychology are examined in various art forms: novels, biographies, drama, concerts, etc. Topics include attitudes prejudice, biases, conformity, relationships, group dynamics and environmental setting.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101; and completion of PSY 101 or SOC 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Behavioral Science
    Note(s): Credit will be granted as either HUM 135 or PSY 135.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 138 - Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences

    3

    This course is an overview of scientific research methods used in the behavioral sciences. It includes topics such as basic research designs, developing hypotheses, sampling procedures, operationalizing variables, ethical issues in research, interpreting data, and exploring and critiquing published research from journals and the Internet.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or SOC 101; and placement above or completion of MAT 080 with a C or better or completion of Math Module 12, 73, or 82.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 150 - Abnormal Psychology

    3



    The symptoms, classifications and therapies employed in the study of maladaptive behavior are examined. Topics include anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, personality disorders, substance abuse, and organic disorders such as mental retardation and degenerative brain diseases.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 151 - Psychology Of Personality

    3



    An integrative study of the psychoanalytic, learning-theory and humanistic approaches to understanding personality formation. The course considers the individual interacting with the social environment and reviews the area of personality assessment including projective, empirical, and observational techniques.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 153 - Community Psychology

    3

    An examination of the principles and concepts of community psychology. Topics will include the prevalence of particular social problems and change strategies, community health, the importance of prevention and resilience, empowerment of client populations and communities, model social agencies in the community, and program evaluation. The course will emphasize experiential learning and draw upon resources and competencies of students and the community itself.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101 and ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 155 - Positive Psychology

    3

    An introductory survey of the science of positive psychology. Positive psychology is the study of the unique characteristics of the human experience that contribute to positive adaptation, growth and well being. It is concerned with helping all people develop their strengths and talents. Topics will include core human strengths, optimal functioning or flow, adaptive coping, optimism, resilience, gratitude and happiness. The course will cover topics by integrating a review of past psychological studies focusing on pathology, examining recent research in this emerging field, and using practical exercises and interventions that have been demonstrated to elicit positive emotions and behaviors.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 160 - Dynamics Of Interpersonal Relations I

    3

    Exploration of the small-group process through participation, interpretation and study. Major focus is on the class itself as an interacting group providing for personal, interpersonal, and intellectual challenge.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 162 - Addictions and Treatment

    3



    This course provides an overview and analysis of various addictions including alcohol, opiates, prescription medications, nicotine, gambling and their histories and treatments. There will be a focus on the personal and social consequences as well as the monetary costs of addictions and treatments. An emphasis will also be on the etiology, epidemiology, pharmacology, symptoms and medical consequences of various addictions. Students will also learn the influence of family history, culture, state and federal laws, ethical issues, and current treatment options.


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    - Identify and understand the medical, social, psychological, and economic impact of addictions on individuals, their families, the health care and criminal justice systems, and the general public.
    - List and analyze the personal and monetary costs of addiction and various treatments in the United States and other countries. Compare and contrast the influence of family behaviors and cultures on addictive choices and behaviors.
    - List and understand a minimum of five (5) treatment modalities and twenty (20) treatment interventions or techniques that are used in the addiction treatment field. All students will develop a treatment plan and demonstrate knowledge of the importance of a multi-faceted approach to treatment.
    - Research and analyze the impact of changes in state and federal laws (such as marijuana laws) and the effects of social policy and attitudes towards specific addictions.
    - Identify and analyze their own value system and perspective on addictions and treatments.
    - Expand their knowledge of vocational options and future educational opportunities in the field of addictions treatment.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 166 - Brain, Mind and Behavior

    3



    In order to begin to unravel the mystery of why humans feel, think, and behave in the ways that we do, it is important to understand the structures and function of the brain and nervous system. In this course, we will explore a range of topics including how the brain operates, regulates, controls, or influences our moods, behavior, cognitive functions, addictions, and psychological disorders. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify important structures of the brain, and will be able to describe and explain how these influence a variety of psyghological functions such as how we fall in love, how someone can feel a missing limb, how memory works, why we can’t tickle ourselves, and much more.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 171 - Social Psychology

    3



    The study of how people influence each other’s beliefs and behaviors, think about and relate to one another. Topics include attraction and love, attitudes, persuasion, aggression, altruism, stereotyping, prejudice, conformity, and group dynamics.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSY 101 or SOC 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    PSY 292 - Asian Literature and Social Psychology: Honors

    3



    This course is an introduction to selected East Asian Studies which explores culture through literature, the arts, and Social Psychology. East Asian culture is examined within its social context through literature and films. Additionally, students will conduct investigative analysis of East Asian culture using Cross-Cultural and Social Psychology frameworks.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 12 college credits with a GPA of 3.2.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Radiologic Technology

  
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    RAD 101 - Introduction To Radiologic Technology

    3



    An introduction into the organization and operation of the Radiology department.  Areas of study will include: patient care, medical terminology, radiation protection, professional ethics, image acquisition and technical evaluation.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the organization and operation of the Radiology department.
    • Define new medical terms.
    • Apply Radiation protection to appropriate personnel.
    • Demonstrate Professional ethics in patient care.
    • Contrast image acquisition techniques.


    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; completion of or concurrent enrollment in MAT 120.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 102 - Imaging Procedures I

    3



    Presents routine radiographic procedures and applicable anatomy of the appendicular skeleton.  Laboratory positioning exercises prepare the student for practical application of the procedures in the assigned radiology department.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe central ray direction, Image Receptor (IR) placements, marker location, source-to-image receptor distance (SID).
    • Demonstrate obtaining the correct patient history, patient care, required breathing instructions, patient position, usable surface landmarks and anatomy demonstrated in each procedure. 
    • Demonstrate by role play and phantom radiography mastery of learned procedures.
    • Choose appropriate technical factors and radiation protection devices.
    • Demonstrate interpersonal and organizational skills when conducting radiographic procedures.


    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Corequisite(s): RAD 103.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 103 - Clinical Practicum I

    3



    Included in this experience are department orientation, a working understanding of medical ethics, patient contact, and observation and performance of indicated radiographic examinations under close supervision with positioning of the chest, abdomen, upper and lower extremities, resulting in performance competency.  16 hours weekly

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations and procedures. 
    • Demonstrate the proper use of radiographic equipment.
    • Recognize the importance of being a team player.
    • Implement the use of appropriate radiation protection procedures including: collimation, time, distance and shielding.
    • Demonstrates interpersonal and organizational skills when conducting radiographic procedures.


    Corequisite(s): RAD 102


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 104 - Radiologic Physics

    3



    The concepts introduced will include an understanding of the principles of physics required in the electrical production of x-rays and the physics principles used in image acquisition techniques.  The student will also review x-ray interaction with matter and have a thorough understanding of the x-ray imaging system. 

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the properties of x-rays.
    • Critique the components of an x-ray imaging system.
    • Analyze the production of x-rays and various characteristics.
    • Explain ionization and the results of ionization during exposure to x-rays.
    • Differentiate between  x-ray production, emission and  interaction with matter.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 101; completion of MAT 120.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 105 - Imaging Procedures II

    3



    A continuation of RAD 102 including routine radiographic procedures and applicable anatomy of the appendicular skeleton, digestive system, surgical and pediatric radiography. Role playing and Phantom Radiography prepares the student for practical application of the procedures in their assigned radiology department. 

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations.
    • Critique Radiographs for applicable anatomy, proper position and correct exposure index.
    • Formulate appropriate technical factors for radiographic procedures.
    • Explain the required breathing instructions, patient position, usable surface landmarks and suitable radiation protection during radiographic procedures.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 101 and RAD 103.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 106 - Principles Of Radiographic Quality

    3



    A continuation of RAD 101 including the topics of patient care, contrast media, radiographic quality, utilization of devices for improving the radiographic image and Digital Imaging. Radiographic pathology will be included.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Compare various digital radiography image receptor and detector systems.
    • Discuss beam restriction and its effect on patient dose and image quality.
    • Analyze the subject and geometric factors that affect image quality.
    • Compare the different types of contrast media.
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 101 and RAD 103.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 107 - Clinical Practicum II

    3



    A continuation and progression of the basic fundamentals of radiographic procedures to include examinations of the skeletal system, surgical, mobile, trauma and pediatric radiography.  Also provides the student with additional image critique.  16 hours weekly.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations and procedures. 
    • Operate radiographic equipment appropriately.
    • Demonstrate appropriate interpersonal relations, organizational skills and professional ethics when interacting with staff and patients.
    • Employ the use of appropriate radiation protection procedures including: collimation, time, distance and shielding.
    • Demonstrate interpersonal and organizational skills when conducting radiographic procedures.
    • Demonstrate assertiveness in seeking out diagnostic exams for increased levels of proficiency.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 103.
    Corequisite(s): RAD 105


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 108 - Clinical Practicum III

    5



    A summer clinical experience providing the student with the opportunity to improve skills and gain confidence in the application of new and learned procedures including: Fluoroscopic, Trauma, Surgical, Mobile and Pediatric radiography.  32 hours weekly.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations and procedures. 
    • Perform mobile and surgical procedures maintaining the principles of sterile technique when applicable.
    • Accurately set up fluoroscopic rooms according to individual procedures.
    • Apply knowledge and skills in the use of appropriate radiation protection procedures including collimation requirements, time, distance, and shielding.
    • Apply knowledge and skills by performing radiologic procedures requiring different routine projections such as trauma radiography.
    • Perform routine pediatric examinations (ages 6 and under).        


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 107.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 201 - Imaging Procedures III

    3



    Formerly Advanced Imaging Procedures

    Major topics include skull, anatomy, positioning and Image Critique.  Advanced procedures such as myelography, arthrography, cystography and hysterosalpingography will be taught. Interventional Radiography will be introduced.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations and procedures. 
    • Critique skull images for positioning, anatomy, centering, baselines and technical factors.
    • Demonstrate appropriate shielding techniques and radiation protection.
    • Specify various advanced procedures.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 105 and RAD 106.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 202 - Fundamentals Of Radiobiology

    3



    Designed to provide fundamental information in the area of applied radiobiology. Course topics will include basic interactions of radiation and matter, biological effects, radiation dose, occupational and non-occupational dose equivalent limits, exposure monitoring and units of measurement. 

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Evaluate radiation safety on every patient using the ALARA principle
    • Differentiate between the effect of radiation on an embryo, fetus, child and adult
    • Assess the radiologic technologist’s responsibility in limiting patient exposure, repeating radiographs, shielding and effective communication
    • Summarize how radiobiology applies to diagnostic radiology


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 104 and RAD 106.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 203 - Clinical Practicum IV

    4



    This practicum is utilized to improve upon positioning skills and to introduce new imaging procedures such as arthrography, cystography and skull radiography.  24 hours weekly

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge and skills performing radiographic procedures at a new clinical site.
    • Determine appropriate patient interaction and preparation for all Radiographic examinations and procedures. 
    • Perform routine pediatric (ages 6 and under) examinations.
    • Perform Operating Room procedures maintaining the principles of sterile technique, applying knowledge of C-arm operation and manipulation.
    • Demonstrate interpersonal and organizational skills when conducting radiographic procedures.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 108.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 204 - Topics In Radiography

    3



    A study of related principles to include:  Image capture techniques, magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, bone densitometry, image critique, radiographic pathology and topics in patient care.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Compare the elements used in different digital systems.
    • Discuss MRI, Mammography and Bone Density procedures.
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills.
    • Demonstrate effective critical thinking skills.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 202.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 205 - Fundamentals of Computed Tomography

    2



    Formerly Principles of Computed Tomography

    This course introduces the fundamentals of Computed Tomography.  Course content includes: imaging procedures, patient care, pharmacology, venipuncture, physics, technical factors, cross sectional anatomy and pathology.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the various generations of Computed Tomography Scanners.
    • Define the CT imaging system components and their functions.
    • Discuss image quality as it relates to spatial resolution, contrast resolution, noise, linearity, and uniformity.
    • Define contrast media’s role in CT imaging and how it may affect patient care.
    • Explain the application of pharmacology as it pertains to CT.
    • Identify the major organs as seen in cross sectional anatomy/ pathology of the head, neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 201.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    RAD 206 - Clinical Practicum V

    4



    Clinical Practicum V further refines radiographic skills and techniques. Rotations through CT, MRI and Interventional radiography will be included, 24 hours weekly.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Work in all areas of the radiology department with indirect supervision such as OR and trauma.
    • Accurately critique all images.
    • Demonstrate appropriate interpersonal relations, organizational skills and professional ethics when interacting with staff and patients.
    • Compare and contrast Diagnostic Imaging to other advanced modalities.


    Prerequisite(s): Completion of RAD 203.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Religion

  
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    REL 101 - Religions Of The World

    3

    An introductory study of the major religions of the world including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students explore the basic beliefs of these religions and consider the relevance of the beliefs in everyday life. Special attention is given to concerns shared by all religions.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Science

  
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    SCI 100 - Explorations in Science

    3

    A broad-based science course that includes activities from various scientific disciplines such as biology, chemistry, physics and environmental sciences, etc. The course is hands-on and stresses learning by doing and will integrate learning strategies, study skills and information on college resources that contribute to college success.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 055; and eligible for ENG 070 or ENG 071.
    Recommendation(s): Concurrent enrollment in ENG 071 and/or ENG 055, if CPT is between 44 and 55, is encouraged.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): Students eligible for ENG 101 are not eligible to enroll in this course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 110 - Chemistry and Physics for the Fire Service

    4



    This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread and are controlled. It introduces the basic principlies of chemistry and physics that govern fire behavior. Students will examine the properties of combustion products, fire-extinguishing agents, and the three states of matter. Proper selection of firefighting chemicals and their application methods will be an integral part of the course.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; placement above or completion of MAT 080 or completion of Math Module 12, 73, or 82.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 121 - Integrated Science I

    4



    The first course in a two-semester sequence intended for, but not limited to, students planning a career in elementary education. Focusing on the physical sciences and using the environment as a theme, elements of chemistry, physics, geology, meteorology and astronomy will be covered through inquiry-based activities. Experiments in these disciplines will help students become skilled in generating and testing hypothesis and gathering and analyzing data. 3 hours lecture/2 hour laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 122 - Integrated Science - Biological Sciences

    4



    The second course in a two-semester sequence intended for, but not limited to, students planning a career in elementary education. Focusing on the biological sciences, topics will include cell structure and function, plant structure and processes, human body systems, biodiversity and the interaction of organisms with each other and their environment. Experiments will help students become skilled in generating and testing hypotheses and gathering and analyzing data. 3 hours lecture/ 2 hours laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 130 - Forensic Science

    4



    This unique course integrates criminal investigative techniques with hands-on experience in the scientific procedures now used in the modern crime laboratory. Topics include: evidence collection, chemical and physical analysis of the evidence and crime scene, impact of DNA technology on criminal investigations. 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 201 - STEM Research I

    1

    Students will engage in STEM research projects under the guidance of individual faculty members. Experimental design, literature search, the scientific method, scientific inquiry, the fostering of teamwork and technical communication of STEM topics will be developed within the framework of a research project. Students have the option of taking sequential courses up to 4 semesters to continue their research.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80; a college lab science with a C or better; and permission of the course instructor.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SCI 202 - STEM Research II

    1

    A Continuation of SCI 201 - Students will engage in STEM research projects under the guidance of individual faculty members. Experimental design, literature search, the scientific method, scientific inquiry, the fostering of teamwork and technical communication of STEM topics will be developed within the framework of a research project. Students have the option of taking sequential courses up to 4 semesters to continue their research.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of SCI 201.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
  •  

    SCI 203 - STEM Research III

    1

    A continuation of SCI 202 - Students will engage in STEM research projects under the guidance of individual faculty members. Experimental design, literature search, the scientific method, scientific inquiry, the fostering of teamwork and technical communication of STEM topics will be developed within the framework of a research project. Students have the option of taking sequential courses up to 4 semesters to continue their research.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of SCI 202.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
  •  

    SCI 204 - STEM Research IV

    1




    A Continuation of SCI 203 - Students will engage in STEM research projects under the guidance of individual faculty members. Experimental design, literature search, the scientific method, scientific inquiry, the fostering of teamwork and technical communication of STEM topics will be developed within the framework of a research project. Students have the option of taking sequential courses up to 4 semesters to continue their research.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of SCI 203.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Sociology

  
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    SOC 101 - Introduction To Sociology

    3



    An introduction to the sociological perspective which emphasizes the effect of society on human behavior. Major concepts covered include race, culture, wealth, poverty, and social class, education, the family and social change.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 105 - Multiple Choices: Social Responsibility in Today’s World

    3

    We are all part of something larger than our selves and this class will examine how our identity and individual circumstances impact our ability to connect with others and with our community. How does one’s individual context influence how we respond to contemporary challenges in society? A multidisciplinary approach will be used to explore this question and topics covered may include art, business, history, literature, science, technology and world events. Students will identify strategic points of tension and opportunities where human connection and compromise are possible. The class will require students to participate in community engagement activities, opportunities for personal reflection and group problem solving.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099. Open to Lowell Connections Program students only.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 106 - Food and Sustainability

    3

    Politicians, scientists, medical professionals, and environmentalists have been giving a lot of recent attention to the negative impacts of our nation’s food. Our reliance on industrial farming and processed foods not only harms our health, but also the Earth by using too many chemicals, polluting machines, and natural resources during production. In this course we will investigate the different viewpoints about what is wrong with our food system and learn about many projects that are trying to make positive change. Using a sociological approach, we will research, compare and analyze thses food projects, films, and books to come away with an informed look at systems of food production and consumption in the U.S. This course will be relevant for any student interested in health and society, food and popular culture, environment and sustainability, and community education.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral or Social Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 118 - Multicultural Communications

    3



    The major issues addressed are the various components of ethnic diversity, attitudes toward such diversity, and the implications these two issues hold for human service professionals. A multicultural model of communication is presented. Provides the opportunity for students considering a career in human-services (teaching, mental health, criminal justice, nursing) to broaden their understanding of, and ability to function more effectively with, members of various ethnic and racial groups.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 120 - The UK - Ireland Experience

    3



    This course is an on-campus and study abroad experience in the UK and Ireland that will focus on traditional and contemporary British and Irish cultures.  Academic and study tour cultural components place an emphasis on situating contemporary England, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland in a literary, historical, and social context. As with all International studies programs at MCC, students are expected to share what they have learned with the college community upon completion of the course.

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    - summarize the history, social structures, and institutions of the UK and Ireland
    - analyze the political struggle of the UK and Ireland through their revolutions, reactions and independence movements
    - describe the UK and Ireland’s cultural and economic development and evaluate its impact in comparison to other contemporary countries
    - examine and compare the UK and Ireland?s cultural preservation strategies with those of other countries
    - analyze cultural and social change in the UK and Ireland, paying particular attention to the contemporary through discussion and experiential service learning
    - write reflective analysis for e-portfolios that employ print and visual sources to explore and identify the social consequences of the UK and Ireland’s commitment to cultural and literary preservation and its place on the global stage

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Multicultural/Global Literacy, Critical Thinking, Personal and Professional Development, and Written and Oral Communication.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed 12 credits in a degree program at MCC before participating in the course.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Social Science, and Behavioral Science Elective


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 121 - The China Experience

    3



    An introductory study of traditional and contemporary Chinese culture and values. Academic and study tour components place an emphasis on situating contemporary China in a geographical, historical, philosophical, and social/political/economic context. The readings for the course include selections designed to provide comparisons between Chinese and American culture values. As with all International studies programs at MCC, students are expected to share what they have learned with the college community upon completion of the course. 


    General Outcomes:


    * summarize the history, social structures, and institutions of China
    * analyze the political struggle of China through their revolutions, reactions and political movements 
    * describe China’s cultural and economic development and evaluate its impact in comparison to other contemporary countries 
    * examine and compare China’s cultural preservation strategies with those of other countries 
    * analyze cultural and social change in China, paying particular attention to the contemporary through discussion and experiential service learning
    * write reflective analysis for e-portfolios that employ print and visual sources to explore and identify the social consequences of China?s commitment to cultural and literary preservation and its place on the global stage

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Multicultural/Global Literacy, Critical Thinking, Personal and Professional Development, and Written and Oral Communication.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits in a degree program at MCC
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Social Sciene or Behavioral Science Elective
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    SOC 123 - The Russian Experience

    3



     

    This course includes a two week travel-study experience in Russia.  To prepare for the cultural and social experience of traveling and studying in Russia, students will participate in classes introducing the culture, history, current events, and language of Russia.  As with all International studies programs at MCC, students are expected to share what they have learned with the college community upon completion of the course.

     
    General Outcomes:


    * Summarize the history and social structures and institutions of Russia 
    * Analyze the political struggle of Russia and Eastern Europe through revolutions, reactions and current political realities 
    * Describe Russia’s economic and cultural development and evaluate its development in comparison to other contemporary Eastern European countries
    * Examine and compare Russia’s environmental and cultural preservation strategies with those of other countries through discussion and experiential service learning
    * Analyze cultural and social change in Russia, paying particular attention to the contemporary
    * Write reflective analysis for e-portfolios that employ print and visual sources to explore and identify the social consequences of Russia’s commitment to cultural preservation and environmental sustainability and its emergence into the global economy

     
    ISLOs:This course supports student development of Multicultural/Global Literacy, Critical Thinking, Personal and Professional Development, and Written and Oral Communication.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits in a degree program at MCC
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Social Science or Behavioral Science Elective
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education Requirement


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

 

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