Aug 07, 2020  
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 
    
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Engineering

  
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    ADM 101 - Introduction to Manufacturing

    3

    This course provides an introduction to manufacturing emphasizing the evolution of current manufacturing systems, including safety and environmental responsibility, quality systems, supply chain management, lean manufacturing, and basic statistical concepts. Topics will be reinforced through industry examples, case studies, and team based problem solving activities.
    Students will be able to:
    -Define key terms associated with modern manufacturing.
    -Define key safety and environmental regulations (OSHA and EPA) applicable to their target industry, company, and job function. 
    -Discuss the goals and methods of Lean, Six Sigma and other quality systems used within manufacturing today.
    -Participate in group problem solving activities using Lean and Six Sigma principles including the 7 QC tools.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement into Math Module 80


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ADM 110 - Precision Machining I

    6



    This is the first of two courses providing instruction and practice in the safe, effective, and efficient operation of the types of machine tools and processes common to the Precision Machining industry.  Students will take this course after completing foundational courses in Computer Aided Design and Introduction to Manufacturing.   Completion of this course is required as part of the Engineering Technology-Precision Machining Certificate, but it will also be a valuable elective for students engaged in other Engineering Technology options.  This course will be delivered at a partnering Technical High School. Students must be able to earn the OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification. Students will later sit for the first 5 of the 11 National Institute for Metalworking Standards (NIMS) Credentials that comprise Machining Level I (designed to meet entry-level requirements for on-the-job skills) .

    Students will be able to:


    -Operate conventional machine shop equipment
    -Demonstrate ability to read a blueprint
    -Create and inspect parts in specified tolerances guided by a blueprint
    -Measure part sizes and tolerances
    -Demonstrate ability to apply basic arithmetic and geometry to set-up machines, including
                -Pythagorean Theorem
                -Right Angle Trigonometry
                -Use of Scientific Calculator

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 110, CAD 169, and ADM 101; and placement into Math module 80


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ADM 111 - Precision Machining II

    6



    This course builds on the basic, manual machining skills developed in Precision Machining I.  The course develops advanced skills in Turning, CNC Milling, CNC Turning, and CNC Programming for both Milling and Turning. In addition to operating industrial CNC machining equipment, students will continue to refine their manual machining skills.  Completion of this course is required as part of the Engineering Technology-Precision Machining Certificate, but it will also be a valuable elective for students engaged in other Engineering Technology options.  This course will be delivered at a partnering Technical High School. Students will be qualified to sit for the 6 remaining NIMS credentials comprising Machining Level I (designed to meet entry-level requirements for on-the-job skills).

    Students will be able to: 


    -Demonstrate knowledge of, and abide by, Shop Safety rules and perform basic machine maintenance
    -Assemble and Inspect Cutting Tools and set up and operate CNC Machine tools
    -Make and inspect parts using blueprints, Geometrical Dimensioning and Tolerancing concepts, and measurement tools
    -Calculate Feeds and Speeds and demonstrate ability to read, understand, and input G-codes and M-Codes
    -Demonstrate proficiency in the utilization of Computer Numerical Controlled equipment including mills and lathes.
    -Author and troubleshoot Computer Numerical Control programs.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ADM 110


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    EGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering

    4

    Principles and methods of engineering for students planning to transfer to a baccalaureate engineering program will be examined in depth. The course will introduce the student to engineering design methods and tools, and their application in solving engineering problems from various engineering disciplines. Tools will include software packages such as Microsoft Excel, AutoCAD and MATLAB. The different disciplines within engineering will be discussed. Skills required for career success such as teamwork, written and oral communication, and problem solving will be emphasized. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101; placement above, completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MAT 195 or MAT 196.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    EGR 210 - Statics

    3

    This course will provide students opportunities to apply Newton’s Laws to engineering problems in statics. The free-body diagram method is emphasized. Topics include vector algebra, force, moment of force, couples, static equilibrium of rigid bodies, trusses, shear and moment diagrams, friction, properties of areas, centroids, moment of inertia, flexible cables, screws, bearings and belts.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of PHY 171; Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MAT 291


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    EGR 211 - Strength of Materials

    3



    This course is designed to introduce the student to stress and deformation analysis of basic structural materials subjected to axial, torsional, bending and pressure loads. The primary focus of the course is on the concepts of stress and strain at a point, stress-temperature relationships, force and deformation analysis of bodies under axial, shearing, flexural, torsional and combined loadings, shear and bending moment diagrams, and Euler Columns.


    Learning Outcomes:
    - Analyze and design structural members subjected to tension, compression, torsion, bending and combined stresses using the fundamental concepts of stress, strain and elastic behavior of materials.
    - Utilize appropriate materials in design considering engineering properties, sustainability, cost and weight
    - Perform engineering work in accordance with ethical and economic constraints related to the design of structures and machine parts

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of EGR 210.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    EGR 212 - Dynamics

    3



    This course is designed to introduce the student to vector development of kinematics of particles and rigid bodies with respect to fixed and moving coordinate systems of one, two, and three dimensions. The primary focus of the course is on the concepts the dynamics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies, angular momentum and the inertia properties of rigid bodies, as well as, energy, impulse and momentum methods


    Learning Outcomes:
    - Describe and analyze the motion of a particle along a straight line.
    - Utilize Newton’s second law to determine the acceleration of an object and/or the forces acting on an object.
    - Apply the concepts of work and energy to determine the change in linear velocity of an object.
    - Practice the concepts of impulse and momentum to analyze the motion of an object during a period of time and to determine velocities of objects after impact.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of both EGR 210 and MAT 291.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


English

  
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    ENG 088 - Academic English for Bilingual Students Educated Outside of the US

    6

    This course is designed for speakers of more than one language who have completed high school before coming to the United States and are ready to advance quickly to college level work. It will utilize theme-based readings of complex academic texts and intensive practice in the writing process for U.S. style academic writing to prepare students for college-level coursework including ENG 101, English Composition I. This will be done through a disciplined practice of close readings and prewriting, writing and rewriting essays. It will include just-in-time instruction in grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and critical thinking required for success in ENG 101. A portion of instruction will take place in a computer classroom.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement above ELL 055 or successful completion of ELL 055 with a grade of C or better.
    Note(s): Students who complete the course with a C or better and meet current departmental exit standards are eligible to enroll in Composition I with Writing Skills Seminar (Accelerated Learning Program) or Composition I. Credits earned in this course will not apply to MCC degree or certificate programs.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 089 - Academic English for Bilingual Students Educated Within US

    6

    This course is designed to support the bilingual, US-educated student in mastering the mechanics of academic reading and writing. It will emphasize critical reading and responding to complex texts plus writing college-level essays that incorporate facts and opinions from the readings. It will include just-in-time instruction in grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and critical thinking required for success in ENG 101, English Composition I. A portion of instruction will take place in a computer classroom.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement above ELL 055 or successful completion of ELL 055 with a grade of C or better.
    Note(s): Students who complete the course with a C or better and meet current departmental exit standards are eligible to enroll in Composition I with Writing Skills Seminar (Accelerated Learning Program) or Composition I. Credits earned in this course will not apply to MCC degree or certificate programs.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 092 - Reading, Writing, and Reasoning

    6

    Reading, Writing, and Reasoning (RWR) is a 6 credit integrated reading, writing, and critical thinking course that includes a one hour weekly workshop. Students will read, evaluate, and analyze college level, thematic, non-fiction texts. Students will write at least four complete essays that demonstrate Standard English conventions and format as well as coherent structure and an analytical understanding of readings. Those who complete the course with a C or better may take the final exam.  At the final exam, students must demonstrate the ability to read, write, and reason at a college-level to be able to move into the next level course:  ENG101 or ENG101 with ENG099.  Credits earned in this course will not apply to MCC degree or certificate programs.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement below 68 on the reading portion of the CPT.
    Note(s): ENG 092 is recommended for any student who places below 68 on the CPT reading placement and who places into ENG 065 or ENG 071 on the writing placement. ENG 092 covers both reading and writing instruction for students based on their placement scores.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 093 - Reading, Writing, and Reasoning Follow-Up

    3

    RWR Follow-Up continues preparation in English for success in college. The course offers individualized instruction in college-level reading and writing assignments to improve reading comprehension and writing effectiveness. Instructors will tailor a learning plan to promote student success. Those who complete the course with a C or better may take the final exam. At the final exam, students must demonstrate the ability to read, write, and reason at a college-level to be able to move into the next level course: ENG101 or ENG101 with ENG099. Credits earned in this course will not apply to MCC degree or certificate programs. This course is available in the Flexible Studies setting.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 088, ENG 089, or ENG 092 with a C- or higher.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): For students receiving a C- in ENG 092 in lieu of repeating ENG 092 (6 credits)


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 099 - Writing Skills Seminar

    3



     

    This course is for students who have placed into ENG 071 with a score of 68 or higher on the reading placement test but would like to earn degree-credit for ENG 101. Students will learn to identify and correct grammatical errors and develop college level reading and writing skills and other strategies for success that will enable them to be successful in a linked ENG 101 and other college level courses. In order to pass ENG 099, all students enrolled in ENG 099 must also pass an in-class writing final exam which will be assessed by two other instructors in addition to the course instructor. By registering for this course, the student will also be registered in a linked ENG 101 taught by the same instructor. ENG 099 is a non-degree credit course and is not transferable.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Placement above 67 on the reading portion of the CPT; placement into ENG 071; and concurrent enrollment in a linked ENG 101.
    Corequisite(s): Enrollment in a linked ENG 101
    Note(s): Students must pass both ENG 099 and ENG 101 with a C- or better to receive three degree credits for ENG 101. Three non-degree credits will be earned for ENG 099. Students may pass ENG 099 without passing ENG 101, which would make them eligible for ENG 101 the following semester.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 101 - English Composition I

    3



    English Composition 1 focuses on developing students’ academic writing, close reading, and critical thinking skills. Using a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, instructor and peer feedback, and revision, students will produce written essays with arguable thesis statements and appropriate use of standard English.  Students will produce a total of 18-24 pages of formal polished writing in three or more source-based essays.

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate comprehension and reflective reading skills, as well as the ability to annotate a text;

    2. Interpret, engage with, and analyze various texts.

    3. Use a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, instructor and peer feedback,and revision to produce written essays with arguable thesis statements and appropriate use of standard English.

    4. Quote, paraphrase, begin to synthesize source material, and document appropriately to maintain academic integrity.

    5. Begin to recognize rhetorical strategies and to incorporate them appropriately in their writing.

    6. Complete formal and/or informal writing and/or oral assignments that ask students to identify one or more of the following dimensions of an issue or topic: ethical, social, civic, multicultural, socio-economic.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion with a grade of B or better in ENG 088, ENG 089, ENG 092, or ENG 093; or placement by exam.
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 102 - English Composition II

    3



    Building on skills learned in English Composition I, students will sharpen their academic writing, close reading, and critical thinking skills, as well as develop research skills. Using a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, instructor and peer feedback, and revision, students will produce thesis-driven, evidence-based essays that employ appropriate rhetorical strategies. In English Composition 2, students will be introduced to at least two documentation styles and will produce a total of 18-24 pages of polished formal writing in three or more source-based essays.

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Apply active and critical reading skills to the analysis and synthesis of a variety of college level texts.

    2. Use a writing process that includes prewriting, drafting, instructor and peer feedback, and revision to produce clearly written, evidence-based, thesis-driven essays that employ appropriate standard English and rhetorical strategies for a defined audience.

    3. Implement research skills that include locating, evaluating, summarizing, quoting, paraphrasing and synthesizing a variety of scholarly and popular sources, and use appropriate documentation to maintain academic integrity.

    4. Use a minimum of two documentation styles.

    5. Complete formal and/or informal writing and/or oral assignments that ask students to identify one or more of the following dimensions of a written or visual text: global/multicultural perspectives; historical, political, economic and social trends; scientific and environmental developments; aesthetic appreciation and creativity.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 with a C- or better.
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 110 - The Autobiographical Adventure: Our Lives as Stories

    3



    The study of autobiography and memoir is designed to help us make meaning of our lives. In this course we will be reading great texts that both tell compelling stories and make meaning of those stories. Then, we’ll be taking ideas and techniques from those texts to inspire our own stories. We will be reading selections from works such as Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” Frank McCourt’s “Angela’s Ashes,” Mary Karr’s “The Liars Club,” Luis J. Rodriguez’s “La Vida Loca: Gang Days in LA,” James McBride’s “The Color of Water,” Nora Seton’s “The Kitchen Congregation,” and Steven King’s “A Memoir on the Craft of Writing”. We will be researching, developing and shaping our own life stories and responding to the work of others in a workshop format.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 111 - Introduction to Chinese Literature

    3



     

    This course will introduce students to China through the literature of classic texts, poetry and novels, and by exploring the influences of Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism and Communism, students will gain a broad perspective on the importance of ritual, familial relations, community and the self in the Chinese world.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 113 - Classics Of Children’s Literature

    3



    A survey of children’s books from nursery rhymes through modern fiction for young adults. Concentrating on a core of classic children’s books, the course treats texts and illustrations to determine how literature helps the child deal with the world.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, Quantitative Literacy, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): Course will include methods for reading literature to children and fostering children’s language and literacy development. Service-Learning placements will be available to aspiring teachers who wish to practice in school settings the skills learned in this course.

    Note: This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 117 - History of Theater

    3

    Familiarizes students with the major periods of world theatrical history and with the evolution of theater between periods. Among others, the periods include Ancient Greek, Italian Renaissance, Elizabethan, French Classic, and Modern.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 118 - Modern Drama

    3

    Explores the significant theatrical movements and theories of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, beginning with Ibsen and including contemporary, living playwrights. Plays are selected and studied from the point of view of the director, actor and designer. Attending area theatrical events is required for discussion and analysis.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 119 - Shakespeare

    3



    The world of William Shakespeare, examined in a global context, in Elizabethan London. We’ll study his poetic and dramatic vision by reading select poems and plays, and by examining themes dealing with inequalities in race, religion, gender and age. We’ll see some plays live or on film, and read some scenes aloud in class.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 120 - Holocaust

    3

    Remember. We must remember. That is the single clearest message we have from the literature of the Holocaust. In this course, students will learn about and remember the events surrounding WWII and the Nazi era through the literature: memoirs, diaries, essays, poetry, and histories. Topics such as racism, anti-Semitism, homosexuality, genocide, propaganda, heroism, and post-war traumatic stress syndrome will be explored. Although generalities will be drawn, the focus will be on how the Holocaust affected individuals and families.

    Corequisite(s): ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 125 - Literature Of Protest And Hope

    3

    An exploration of protest and hope found in literature, music, and art throughout the world. We examine art forms such as short stories, poetry, drama, music, paintings, and film which helped to inform, sustain, comfort, and empower during difficult periods of human history. We look at, and listen to, “voices” of dissent, despair, and hope - artistic responses to the Holocaust, China’s Cultural Revolution, 9/11, the Cambodian “killing fields,” American abolitionist and civil rights movements, human rights struggles in Latin America, South Africa’s apartheid years, and conflicts in the Middle East.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 130 - Voices From Behind Bars: The Literature Of Prisons

    3



    Explores the world of prisons, both as a reality and as a metaphor in our lives, utilizing literature from prisons around the globe. This course asks students to consider issues of incarceration while reading passages from classics such as “The Falconer,” “Merchant of Venice” and the Bible, as well as more modern texts as “Short Eyes” and “Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number.”

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 140 - World Literature I

    3



    A survey of major literary works from the classical world through the European Renaissance. Readings will feature various literary genres and themes, with an emphasis on gaining insights into the foundations of our contemporary global civilization. Selections may vary and may include the Bible, ancient Greek drama, Buddhist and Asian philosophies, medieval literature, Shakespeare and others.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 141 - World Literature II

    3



    A survey of the literary and philosophical influences from the Renaissance through modern times. Selections may vary and may include Shakespeare, Voltaire, Pushkin, Hesse, Esquivel, and others.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 143 - British Literature Survey

    3

    A survey of British Literature selected works of major British authors representative of literary time periods and movements within British history from the medieval to modern eras.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 150 - Creative Writing I

    3

    The forms of poetry, the short story and the novel are explored through each student’s written efforts to find the genre in which he/she is most comfortable. All classes are seminars in which each individual is expected to assume, at various and appropriate times, the roles of author-reader, critic and editor.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 151 - Creative Writing and Publishing

    3

    This course is an introductory exploration of the publishing world for students interested in creative writing. Through in-class work, outside the class activities, and guest presentations, students will have the opportunity to learn about and participate in the various ways in which creative writing is published, both as writers and editors in such venues as readings, poetry slams and other performances, as well as publishing in both print and electronic journals, including, but not limited to, producing the college’s literary journal.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 150.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 155 - Reading Like a Writer: Fiction

    3

    The first requirement in becoming a writer is being a reader. An introductory exploration into the form and practice of fiction, focusing on the choices writers make in point of view, voice, style, characterization, setting and plot in both novels and short stories. Surveying both recognized and new works of technical merit from one or more of the historical movements in fiction such as, but not limited to Romanticism, Naturalism, Realism, Modernism, Post-Modernism, or Minimalism, students will be expected to engage in both analytical ad creative responses in order to improve and hone their own fiction.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 156 - Reading Like a Writer: Poetry

    3

    The first requirement in becoming a writer is being a reader. An introductory exploration into the form and practice of poetry, focusing on the choices writers make in writing in either fixed form or free form styles by manipulating line and stanza breaks; using concrete imagery; manipulating language by using figures of speech; and making language musical by using rhyme, meter and consonant and vowel sounds; and how they work together to create, manipulate and support the various forms of irony (verbal, dramatic, situational) through which the poem delivers its emotional and meaningful content. Surveying works of technical merit from both new and recognized masters of some of the schools of poetry, such as but not limited to Concrete and Confessional Poetry, the San Francisco and Harlem Renaissances, Modernism, New Formalism and Slam, students will be expected to engage in both analythical; and creative responses in order to improve and hone their own poetry.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 160 - American Literature I

    3

    A survey of literature from the 17th century to the mid-19th century. The course reflects the diversity of the American experience through its writers. Readings include such literary forms as letters, journals, essays, autobiographies, and selections from the Native American oral tradition as well as traditional genres. Included will be writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Anne Bradstreet, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allan Poe, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 161 - American Literature II

    3



    A survey of representative American authors from the mid-19th century to the present day. Selections may vary and may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Frost, Hemingway, Morrison and others.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): ENG 160 American Literature I not required.

    Note: This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 170 - Crime and Punishment in Literature

    3



    Through history, writers have been fascinated by criminal acts, those who commit them and those who bring wrong doers to justice. This course is a survey of literature exploring the criminal mind and society’s response to criminal acts, and will consider topics such as the causes of crime, the motivations of criminals and crime fighters, rationales for punishment and the desire for redemption. A variety of literary genres will be covered including true crime, fiction and nonfiction.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 175 - Irish Literature

    3

    The unique Irish wit and love of language expressed in stories, plays, poems and songs. Readings concentrate on early Celtic legends and tales, and such important modern writers as Synge, O’Casey, Joyce, Yeats, O’Connor, Lavin and Heaney. Although the emphasis of the course is on literature, time is devoted to the origin and culture of the early Celts, to the history and continuing struggles of the Irish people.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 180 - Science Fiction And Fantasy

    3

    An examination of major representative works of science fiction and fantasy by such writers as Bradbury, Asimov, Poe and Lovecraft. Not an historical survey, but an exploration of significant trends, themes and techniques from a literary point of view.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 185 - The Short Story

    3

    Examination of short stories from around the world, presenting the techniques and the nature of the short story as literature so that the reader may better understand and enjoy the genre. Short analytical papers and exams are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities; Literature


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENG 200 - Creative Writing II

    3

    A continuation of Creative Writing I. Examines the techniques of fiction and poetry through the study of a few writers and through discussion of student manuscripts.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 102.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


English Language Learner

  
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    ELL 053 - Reading & Writing For ELL-Intermediate I

    6

    This course expands the range of writing to include description and narration. Emphasis will be on the continuation of the development of reading fluency and vocabulary expansion using longer texts. Reading and writing activities will be integrated through one or more of the following methods: essay writing, reading response, journal writing, and autobiography.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement by exam.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 054 - ELL Reading & Writing I

    6

    Students are introduced to the process approach of writing a multi-paragraph essay with mastery of simple verb and sentence structures. Readings will include primarily nonfiction texts.  Reading and writing will be integrated through source-based writing that includes annotation, summary, and essays that support a position with details and examples from a reading.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement by exam.
    Note(s): Replaces Prior ELL 053 and ELL 054.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 055 - ELL Reading & Writing II

    6

    Students will use the process approach for writing a multi-paragraph essay with a variety of verb and sentence structures. Readings will include primarily nonfiction texts to ease the transition to college reading and writing. Reading and writing will be integrated through source-based writing that will include annotation, summary, and a critical response essay.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ELL 054 with a C or better or placement by exam.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 063 - Listening and Speaking for ELL Intermediate I

    3

    This class emphasizes developing speaking fluency and listening comprehension for non-native speakers of English. Pronunciation exercises will include practicing the correct sounds, stress, and rhythm of the spoken language. Conversation exercises will allow students to share information, ideas, and opinions.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement by exam


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 074 - Grammar and Editing I

    3

    Covers the most important grammatical structures in which ELL students are most likely to make errors. Prepares students to proofread and edit their own writing.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement into ELL 054.
    Note(s): Replaces Prior ELL 073 and ELL 074.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 075 - Grammar and Editing II

    3

    Students practice using complex grammatical forms and sentence structures in English, developing necessary skills to proofread and edit their own writing with the goal of producing error free writing in order to succeed in upper level writing courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement by exam or successful completion of ELL 074.
    Note(s): Replaces Prior ELL 075 and ELL 076.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 095 - Intensive Academic Skills

    6

    Intensive Academic Skills provides intensive instruction in the critical thinking, reading and writing skills required in ENG 101, English Composition and other credit bearing courses.  Using theme-based readings from a variety of genres, coursework will emphasize independent reading of complex academic texts, critical response to ideas and information in academic texts, and writing essays that integrate ideas and information from academic texts.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ELL 096 - Intensive Language Skills

    6

    This course is designed for English Language Learners who have received education outside the U.S. and are ready to advance quickly to college level work.  It will utilize theme-based readings of complex academic texts and intensive practice in the writing process for U.S. style academic writing to prepare students for college-level coursework including ENG101, Composition I.  This will be done through a disciplined practice of close readings and prewriting, writing, and rewriting essays.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Environmental Science

  
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    ENV 103 - The Age of Dinosaurs

    3



    Introduces the student to the dominant life forms of the Mesozoic era, which extended from about 240 million years to 65 million years before the present. The unifying themes used throughout the course are concerned with the evolution diversification, and classification of the dinosauria, the most familiar, successful, yet least understood terrestrial vertebrates of all time. By examining the geological and ecological setting of the Mesozoic in conjunction with the fossilized remains, the student should gain insight into the nature of these enigmatic animals. The dinosaur studies at both the professional and popular levels will also be examined, through discussion of some of the controversies surrounding dinosaur classification, extinction, physiology and behavior.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 108 - Renewable Energy

    3

    An examination of the need for sustainability in our use of energy resources. We will discuss the problems with dependence on non-renewable fossil fuels, including energy insecurity, air pollution, and global warming. Alternatives to be explored include: conservation, solar energy, wind power, hydropower, biomass, and hydrogen fuel cells. Students will conduct personal energy audits and cost-benefit analyses. Additionally, environmental, science, and economic data will be analyzed and “energy in the news” articles will be used to highlight developments in this rapidly changing field.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 110 - Introduction to Ocean and Marine Biology

    3

    Oceanography: history of the ocean and oceanography, seawater, sediments, and ocean evolution; ocean currents, waves, tides; shorelines and shoreline processes; marine environment. Marine biology: plankton, on the ocean floor; marine fish and fisheries, seashore life; the intertidal zone; seashore birds; marine mammals. No science background required.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 113 - Weather and the Atmosphere

    3



    Students are introduced to weather elements and observations that include atmospheric temperature, pressure, moisture, global air circulation patterns, and air masses. Understanding of the interaction of these various elements of the atmosphere is key to weather analysis and forecasting and will lead to a brief introduction to the more severe forms of weather such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 115 - Environmental Studies

    3



    An interdisciplinary course in ecological/environmental education designed to develop an understanding and awareness of our environment, how the environment can change and the effects of such change. The course explores the role which humans play in causing environmental change and the underlying values and ethical judgments involved in making choices. Includes a study of the structure and function of ecosystems, thermodynamics, and an examination of selected environmental problems.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Quantitative Literacy, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 131 - Environmental Science with Lab

    4

    An interdisciplinary course in ecological environmental education designed to develop an understanding and awareness of our environment, how the environment can change and the effects of such change. The course explores the role which humans play in causing environmental change and the underlying values and ethical judgments involved in making choices. The course also includes a study of the structure and function of ecosystems, energy, and the examination of selected environmental problems. The lab sections will investigate alternative energy, environmental monitoring, and the influences of human populations on ecosystems. 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ENV 141 - Introduction to Geology

    4



    This course will explore a range of topics of interest from within the realm of geology. Emphasis will be on the materials that comprise the earth, the processes that shape the surface and the forces that are at work that drive these processes and produce and alter the materials. Through laboratory and classroom exercises the student will uncover the evidence that geologists use to reconstruct past events in an effort to better understand predict and possibly avoid clashes between human activities and natural geologic processes such as floods, beach, slope and soil erosion, sea level changes and ground water contamination. Geological hazards such as volcanoes and earthquakes will be explored and evaluated in the context of Plate Tectonics Theory. By tracing the historical development of this theory students will gain insight into the scientific method which is at the core of all scientific disciplines. 3 hours lecture/2 hour laboratory.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Quantitative Literacy, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Ethics

  
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    ETH 101 - Ethics and Society

    3



    An introductory study of traditional and contemporary ethical philosophies and an analysis of how they apply to the chief moral issues of our time. Students in the course explore such moral virtues as courage, compassion and generosity, as well as moral vices like greed, envy, and hypocrisy. Relevant moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and our obligation to feed the poor are discussed.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ETH 102 - Business Ethics

    3

    An introductory study of traditional and contemporary ethical philosophies and how they apply to contemporary business practices. The course explores such issues as worker’s rights, discrimination, truth in advertising, and the obligation of business to consumers.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ETH 103 - Computers, Ethics, and Society

    3

    This course is an introductory study of the diverse role computers and information technology play in various societies throughout the world. The course will include an analysis and discussion of the social, political, and economic impact of computers and information technology, an examination of workplace and ethical dilemmas created by computers and information technology, and inquiry into the philosophical and psychological implications of these new technologies.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    ETH 105 - Introduction To Bioethics

    3



    An introductory study of contemporary issues in bioethics and the ethical theories that serve as a framework for making decisions about those issues. The topics covered will include: ethical dilemmas in the workplace, professional relationships to patients and experimental subjects, reproductive decision-making, decisions about the end of life, issues in biomedical research, and justice in health care. Appropriate for all students but particularly relevant for students in the Biotechnology and Health Careers programs.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Social Responsibility, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Fire Protection and Safety Technology

  
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    FPS 100 - Introduction to Fire Protection

    3

    This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in the fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; and life safety initiatives.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 101 - Fundamentals Of Fire Prevention

    3

    This course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation, proper fire prevention and inspection techniques.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 150 - Hazardous Materials

    3

    Identification of materials that require special handling during a fire. Covers the basic principles of chemistry (inorganic and organic) as well as related principles of mathematics and physics.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 151 - Fire Science Hydraulics

    3

    Incompressible fluids, including fluid properties, principles of fluid status and fluid flow system, pipe friction and heat loss, flow measurements utilizing appropriate test equipment, principles and construction of pumping and related hydraulic machinery. Applications related to fire protection systems. Covers material helpful in civil service examinations.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80; and completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 152 - Fire Protection Systems And Equipment

    3

    This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. It concentrates on fixed automatic sprinkler systems and components necessary for their operation. Covers portable fire extinguishers; fire and smoke detectors; fixed extinguishing systems using Halon dry chemicals.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 153 - Building Construction For Fire

    3

    This course provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 160 - Principles of Fire and Emergency Services

    3

    This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emrgency services.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 200 - Fire Arson Investigation

    3

    A basic course for fire investigation. Topics covered include general laws, determining the point of origin, motivation and profile of fire setters, and case preparation.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 201 - Fire Company Officership

    3

    An introduction to the responsibilities, activities, organization and conduct of the first-line company officer, with emphasis placed on the effective use and supervision of personnel under the officer’s command. Topics include communication, supervisory skills, leadership, and motivational techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    FPS 203 - Law and The Fire Service

    3

    Law and the Fire Service reviews state and federal regulations affecting the fire service. Focuses on areas of fire prevention, labor relations and OSHA.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of FPS 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Geography

  
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    GGY 120 - World Geography

    3



    A study of geography aimed at developing a knowledge and appreciation of natural environments throughout the world, with emphasis on human interrelationships within these environments. Included are political, economic and cultural factors related to the physical environment.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Government

  
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    GOV 110 - Comparative Government

    3



    A comparative analysis of contemporary political ideologies and practices with consideration given to the behavior of the individual and the group in modern society. Topics include an examination of democratic theories, socialism, communism, anarchism, authoritarianism, and other selected issues concerning power in society.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    GOV 120 - American Government

    3



    An analysis of the political and governmental system of the United States, the principles upon which it is founded, and the institutions and systems which comprise it. An examination of selected social issues and political problems relevant to the American experience is also conducted.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Social Responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


History

  
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    HST 121 - United States History Before 1865

    3



    A survey and analysis of the history of the United States and its institutions from colonial times through the period of the Civil War. Topics may include the events which led to the American Revolution, the Constitution and the early Republic, the Jeffersonian and Jacksonian periods and the emergence of sectionalism and its culmination in the American Civil War.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 122 - United States History After 1865

    3



    A survey and analysis of the history of the United States and its institutions from the end of the Civil War through the 20th century. This course explores the historical, cultural, political, economic, and institutional forces and events that shaped United States during this period. Topics may include the reunification of north and south, western expansion, and the growth of national power in a global context.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 124 - Recent American History

    3

    This course is an investigation of the history of the United States from World War II to the present. Attention is given to political issues, institutions, political and social leaders as well as economic, social, and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience and relates American history to the broader global context. Topics may include the Cold War, the upheavals of the 1960s, the Vietnam War, and the Reagan Revolution.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 128 - Modern China

    3

    China plays a major role on the world stage in the 21st century.  With China’s rise as a global power, we need to know more about it, the character of early Western involvement and Chinese responses, the rise of Chinese communism, and China’s struggle to modernize.  The focus of this course will depend on the dynamics within and outside of China such as current social, political, environmental, and economic issues.  Topics may include Chinese popular media, financial and commercial institutions, concepts of deviance and crime, and Chinese and American differing cultural perceptions.  Understanding the complex reality that is modern China provides a competitive edge in today’s world.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Behavioral or Social Science Elective.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 130 - History Of World Civilization Before 1500

    3



    A topical survey of the major cultural groupings in the world community from the beginnings of civilization to early modern times. Major attention is given to a comparative analysis of Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Indian, Chinese, Greco-Roman, African, Amerindian, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic civilizations.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 131 - History Of World Civilization After 1500

    3



    A topical survey of the major cultural groupings in the world community from early modern times to the contemporary era. Topics covered include industrialization, the development of a world economy, political ideologies, and global interdependence.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 132 - Contemporary Latin American History

    3



    This course traces the historical trajectory of the people of Latin America from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Students will be introduced to the rich history of Latin America, exploring the achievements of their people and discussing the response of Latin Americans to the challenges of the world around them. We shall examine burning issues such as social inequality, ideological and political agendas, relations between races, trade and globalization, religious options, women and social change, social movements, and dictators vs. heroes in rapidly-changing nations. Students will also look at major events that affected Latin America’s relationship with the U.S. through the lens of foreign policy, migration and the legacy of the arrival to the U.S. This course will conclude by examining Latin America’s place in world history in the 21st century.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 139 - Christian and Islamic Cultures in Peace and Conflict

    3



    This course will explore themes from life in Medieval Spain that are still reflected in today’s global headlines. A period from the 5th century to 1492, this was a time and place when religiously rooted cultures were in conflict on the battlefield, in the political arena, and in the arts. Students will examine topics such as the Visigoth invasion, the motives of the expansion of Islam in Western Europe, the mystery of the Christian Pilgrimage to Santiago of Compostela, the rise of Cordoba as a cultural rival to Baghdad, the Christian reconquest and the end of Spanish Judaism, and of Muslim Granada. Major attention will be given to the theme of encounters: the influence of Islam on Western Europe through its pervasive cultural presence in Spain, and the singular moment of interaction between Muslims, Christians and Jews, which for a time developed a culture of tolerance among the three faiths.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    Note(s): This course satisfies a Social Science Elective.
    This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 290 - World Cultures: Honors Seminar

    3



    This course is an interpretive survey of the development of selected societies and cultures from ancient to modern times. The class presents a comparative and interdisciplinary study of world cultures within the context of their religious and philosophical traditions. Additionally, this seminar examines the nature of multiculturalism in modern societies and analyzes the meaning and relevance of cultural chauvinism, race, and racism within their historical contemporary contexts.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 with a B or better; completion of 12 college credits with a GPA of 3.2 or better; or by permission of Honors Director.
    General Education Elective(s): This course will satisfy requirements for the Honors Program, the interdisciplinary option, general education, humanities, and social sciences.
    Note(s): Will fulfill Commonwealth Honors Colloquium Requirement.
    This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 291 - Latin American Literature and History: An Honors Seminar

    3



    This course will explore Latin American culture and society from the independence generation of the 19th century to the globalization of the 21st century. The course will provide students with a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective on the history and literature that contributed to the formation of Latin American cultural identity. Major attention will be given to topics such as the legacy of colonialism, nation building, cultures, migration, race, religion, women, international relations, reform and revolutionary movements in Latin America.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 with a B or better; completion of 12 college credits with a GPA of 3.2 or better; or by permission of Honors Director.
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 295 - The Middle East and Islamic World: An Honors Seminar

    3



     

     

    This course examines the history of the Middle East and the Islamic World from the time of Muhammad to the present. It will provide an introduction to the history of this often turbulent region. It will expose students to the processes and patterns that have shaped the history of the Islamic World. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the region faces today. But, at the same time, it will also provide students with the knowledge to shatter the myths and stereotypes about the Middle East and the Islamic World.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 12 college level credits with a GPA of at least 3.2 and completion of ENG 101; or by permission of Honors Director.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HST 310 - Peru Experience

    3

    This course is a travel-study experience that offers an interdisciplinary approach to Peru and its healthcare system. It will provide students an opportunity to support the college’s mission of service to regions beyond our borders. Classes on campus will prepare for this service experience by focusing on situating contemporary Peru through a combination of geographical, historical, social, political and economic contexts. Mandatory classes and readings, with a focus on cultural values and communication, will be held at the Lowell Campus prior to the travel to prepare the students for the service component. Students will be providing services to meet healthcare needs of underserved clients in a rural setting in and around Trujillo, Peru. A series of seminars will be held and an opportunity to connect with Peruvian college students while in Peru will afford students an opportunity to share healthcare perceptions and foster cultural understanding.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first year of a Health Careers program


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Homeland Security

  
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    HOM 100 - Introduction to Homeland Security

    3

    This course will introduce students to the vocabulary and important components of homeland security. We will discuss the importance of the agencies associated with homeland security and their interrelated duties and relationships. We will examine historical events that impact homeland security. We will explore state, national, and international laws impacting homeland security. We will examine the most critical threats confronting homeland security.

    Note(s): Program admission process includes essay submission and review by MCC committee. TSA management and MCC then select TSO’s for each course based on the essay.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HOM 101 - Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

    3

    This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HOM 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HOM 102 - Transportation & Border Security

    3

    This course provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as different methods employed to address these challenges. The course covers a time period from post 9-11 to the present. The course explores topics associated with border security and security for transportation infrastructure, to include: seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges, rail lines, pipelines, and buses. The course will include an exploration of technological solutions employed to enhance security of borders and transportation systems. Students will be required to discuss the legal, economic, political, and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. The course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the variety of challenges inherent in transportation and border security.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HOM 100.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Human Services

  
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    HUS 101 - Introduction to Human Services

    3

    An introduction to and overview of the terminology, client populations, and career options in human services. The focus of the course will be on individuals in need, understanding our own value systems, social policies and their impact, and critical trends, such as self advocacy, managed care, and prevention.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 102 - Alcohol/Substance Abuse Treatment with Groups and Families

    3

    This course will prepare students to facilitate groups with substance abusers, with couples in which one or both partners are recovering, collaterals of substance abusers, and adult children of substance abusers. Topics covered will include techniques for group leaders in establishing groups, how to overcome defenses and roadblocks in the group setting, and the therapist’s role in the group, as well as transference and countertransference.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 103 - Stress Management and Relapse Prevention

    3

    This course will examine the effects of stress and the development of stress management skills for individuals in recovery and for counselors working in the field of addiction treatment. The foundation of the course is an understanding of how the inability to cope with internal and external stressors can lead to addiction relapse. Particular emphasis is on the specific stressors experienced in the first years of recovery, learning to use and teach stress management techniques to help clients, and research and clinical practices most relevant to relapse prevention.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 104 - Principles of Developmental Disabilities

    3

    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and practices of providing community support services to people with mental retardation. The course has classroom and practicum components. Weekly lectures are provided by the instructor and by visiting faculty who are practitioners in the field. A concurrent practicum in a human service agency is required. Weekly reading assignments, weekly journals and a short paper are part of the course requirements.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 105 - Special Topics in Developmental Disabilities

    3

    This course is designed to develop core competencies required for staff serving people with mental retardation. This course addresses the topics of human rights, health and safety, medication administration, first aid and CPR, fire safety, and the skills outlined in the National Community Support Skills Standards. The question that will guide the study and discussion of these topics is how to balance the health and safety of those served with the right of choice and self-determination.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 106 - Introduction to Fundamentals of Children’s Behavioral Health

    3



    An introduction to key clinical terms and concepts related to the Children’s Behavioral Health Workforce (CBH) to reduce mental health disparities and increase quality of care in racial, ethnic and underserved communities.  This course focuses on specifics of Children’s Behavioral Health care including systems of care, skills for working in community health, and working with youth and families as Family Partners and Therapeutic/Peer Mentors.

    Students will be able to:


    * Describe “family-driven” care and how it differs from “family-centered” care
    * Help a youth or parent identify family strengths using a strengths-based approach
    * Develop and implement a crisis plan
    * Use role plays and rehearsals to help parents and youth practice self-advocacy
    * Navigate child-serving state agencies


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 151 - Counseling Theory/Process

    3

    This course will focus on techniques of intervention used in individual, group and family work. Therapies included are: behavior modification, psychodynamic, existential-humanistic, client centered, gestalt, transactional analysis, rational emotive, reality, and family systems. Also discussed will be such questions as when to use a particular intervention, when to include another member of the family in the work, and when to recommend a particular kind of therapy.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HUS 201.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 152 - Current Issues Human Services

    3

    Covers a range of specialties within the field of mental health and human services, including developmental disabilities, mental retardation, alcohol and drug abuse, child and adolescent treatment, sexuality, family therapy, and depression, suicide, loss and grief. The course is taught through lectures and workshops conducted by experts in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 152 - Current Issues in Human Services

    3

    Covers a range of specialties within the field of mental health and human services, including developmental disabilities, mental retardation, alcohol and drug abuse, child and adolescent treatment, sexuality, family therapy, and depression, suicide, loss and grief. The course is taught through lectures and workshops conducted by experts in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    Intensive Value(s): Written Communication, Computer Literacy


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 153 - Supervised Field Placement/Seminar I

    4

    Students contract for a minimum of 150 hours per semester at a practicum placement and a weekly seminar at the college. Students are supervised by an experienced staff person at the fieldwork site and by the course instructor who visits the sites and maintains ongoing contact with the staff supervisor. Designed to increase understanding of entry-level positions in human services. Students have the opportunity to investigate potential jobs in human service fields, to apply interpersonal communications skills and to work with individuals who are receiving support from human service agencies.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HUS 200 or HUS 201.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 154 - Supervised Field Placement/Seminar II

    4

    A continuation of the field placement and seminar core sequence. Students must complete a minimum of 150 hours at a field placement site and attend a weekly seminar at the college. Supervised Field Placement and Seminar II provides a continuation of experience in the modalities, theories, techniques and career building at human service agencies. Each student is responsible for a weekly journal and for documentation of their hours and responsibilities.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HUS 153.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 200 - Introduction to Counseling Skills

    3

    This course focuses on the techniques and processes involved in helping relationships. Students explore the basic concepts and facilitative skills of helping relationships while building effective observation, assessment, treatment planning, and one-on-one interview skills. Students are introduced to counseling theories and their related processes and techniques including behavioral, person-centered, existential, and relationship building. Through a combination of readings, lectures, and structured learning experiences and exercises, students explore the nature and range of human characteristics and individual potential interventions.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUS 201 - Counseling Skills

    3

    This course focuses on the techniques and processes involved in a helping relationship. Designed to develop student effectiveness in assessment, treatment planning, and one-to-one interview skills through a combination of readings, role plays and structured learning experiences with an emphasis on multicultural diversity. Designed as a preparation for Supervised Field Placement.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Humanities

  
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    HUM 100 - Explorations in Humanities

    3

    This dynamic course will introduce the activities in the humanities: music, art, dance, theater, philosophy, and literature. The course is hands-on, stresses learning by doing and will integrate learning strategies, study skills and information on college resources to help sharpen learning skills that contribute to college success.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 092, ENG 093, or ENG 099.
    Recommendation(s): Concurrent enrollment in ENG 071 and/or ENG 055, if CPT is between 44 and 55, is encouraged.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): Students eligible for ENG 101 are not eligible to enroll in this course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUM 102 - Introduction To The Humanities

    3



    A general introduction to the humanities, music and theater; the visual and plastic arts (architecture, sculpture, painting, photography, and film); literature and philosophy. Surveys some major works and requires some experiential learning, trips to museums and galleries, musical and dramatic performances. Although the primary focus is on the Western tradition, some works from other world cultures are included.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Multicultural and Global Perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    HUM 104 - Myths

    3

    Asks how myths came about and why they exist. Readings from the ancient cultures of Rome, Greece, Egypt and Mesopotamia, as well as an exploration of the myths of the North American Indian and Asian peoples.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

 

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