Aug 08, 2020  
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 
    
Middlesex Community College Academic Catalog 2017-18 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business Administration

  
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    BUS 190 - Tourism Geography

    3

    Comprehensive study of the major domestic and international destination markets as they relate to the selling and marketing of travel. The following subject areas are covered: Western Hemisphere Destinations - Comprehensive and detailed study of major destinations within the Western Hemisphere with emphasis on the following areas: Continental U.S., Hawaii, Alaska, Bermuda, Bahamas, Caribbean Islands, and Latin America. Comprehensive and detailed study of major destinations within the Eastern Hemisphere with emphasis on the following areas and regions: the new Europe, Eastern Europe, Middle East/Africa, Orient, South Pacific and balance of Asia.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 191 - Tourism Management

    3

    This course introduces students to the different sectors of the tourism industry; retail travel, tour companies, on line travel companies, destination management companies airlines, ground transportation, cruise lines and meeting management.  The course is enhanced with audio interviews featuring tourism industry professionals.  In addition students will participate in an interactive on line virtual tourism enterprise and create their own tourism business.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 192 - Convention and Event Sales and Planning

    3

    This course provides an examination of the various operational aspects of convention and event management. Included are marketing of meetings, planning and managing meetings, and new technology in the meetings industry. Students are given a comprehensive managerial overview of the industry.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 210 - Principles Of Management

    3

    This course provides the student with foundations of management theory and practice. Topics of study include the management functions of planning, organization, controlling, leadership and decision-making.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and completion of BUS 110


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 211 - Entrepreneurship in Small Business Management

    3

    Start-up operational factors, venture capital, management principles, cost accounting, and market analysis. Designed to aid individuals in development of a workable small business plan for starting and maintaining their own businesses.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 110; or completion of or concurrent enrollment in BUS 130


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 212 - Human Resource Management

    3

    Human Resource Management is the study of the policies and practices involved in carrying out the “people” or human resource aspects of a management position. These activities include: recruiting, screening, training, compensating, rewarding, appraising, health and safety, and fairness concerns of employees who are necessary to achieve organizational objectives.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 110


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 213 - Business Communications

    3

    Provides students with the opportunity to learn a wide range of communication skills and applications. This process will enable them to be more successful in an increasingly competitive, diverse, and global business environment. Topics covered include the writing process, listening and intercultural communication, group dynamics, platform speaking skills, and a seminar on the employment search process.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 214 - Business Internship

    3

    The business internship provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom learning and strengthen interpersonal and technical skills in a work experience related to their field of study. Students complete an online course in addition to completing a minimum of 135 hours of work during the semester at an approved site.  The online course focuses on workplace issues  based on students’ experiences at their internship sites. Students must obtain an approved internship before the semester begins. The office of Career Services provides assistance in this process. In some cases, with the approval of the Dean, a student may use a current work site as their internship site. 

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and completion of 12 credits in the student’s degree or certificate program with a GPA of 2.0 or higher.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 220 - Introduction To Accounting II

    3

    Accounting is the language of business. This course examines the accounting function as it relates to the process of planning, recording and evaluating the investing and financing activities of a business. Topics covered include accounting for inventories, operational assets, equity financing, long-term debts, the preparation of the statement of cash flows. General ledger software and other appropriate computer applications will be integrated throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 120
    Note(s): BUS 120 combined with BUS 220 may be taken in place of BUS 221.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 221 - Financial Accounting

    4

    Emphasizes the analysis, interpretation and use of accounting information by external decision-makers. Specific topics include the accounting cycle; GAAP; preparation and analysis of financial statements; internal controls; accounting for inventories; receivables, cash, plant and equipment, current and long-term liabilities, and stockholders’ equity; and the statement of cash flow. Computer applications, including spreadsheets and the analysis of an annual report are integrated throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099; eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80; and completion of CAP 101.
    Note(s): A combination of Accounting I and Accounting II is similar in content to Financial Accounting. Students will not receive credit for Accounting I, Accounting II, and Financial Accounting.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 222 - Introduction To Finance

    3

    Internal financial management of a corporation. The administration of working capital, intermediate and long-term funds, break-even analysis, cash flow forecasts, financial forecasts are covered.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 120 or BUS 221


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 223 - Managerial Accounting

    3

    Emphasizes the use of accounting information for managerial decision making.  Specific topics include cost behavior; CVP analysis; budgeting; cost accumulation systems; activity-based costing; and relevant costs for decisions.  Computer applications, including spreadsheets, are integrated throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 220 or BUS 221; and completion of CAP 101


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 224 - Intermediate Accounting I

    3

    The fundamental procedures and basic principles on which financial statements are based.  A detailed review of the balance sheet and income statement emphasizing cash, temporary investments, receivables, and inventories.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 220 or BUS 223 or BUS 320


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 225 - Intermediate Accounting II

    3

    Includes detailed study of property, plant and equipment, intangibles, current and long-term liabilities, investments, contributed capital, earnings per share, and the statement of cash flows.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 321 or BUS 224


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 226 - Computerized Accounting

    3

    Working with a current software package, students learn how to set up and maintain a computerized accounting system. Students will learn to record transactions using various modules, including general ledger, invoicing, job costing, budgeting and fixed assets.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 220 or BUS 221


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 227 - Taxation

    3

    Federal Income Tax laws and procedures are reviewed with emphasis on understanding how tax rules can advantageously be taken into account in personal, investment, and business decisions.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 220 or BUS 221


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 240 - Principles Of Marketing

    3

    This course examines business activities that match consumers with an organization’s resources. Topics covered are the marketing concept, the marketing environment, ethics and social responsibility, consumer behavior, global marketing, market research, market segmentation, and the marketing mix.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 110 or BUS 130.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 241 - Global Marketing

    3

    A survey of today’s complex and dynamic Global Marketing Environment. Topics include an examination of world trade and the continuing movement from protectionism to a borderless economic world. Additionally, we review environmental issues such as cultural, economic and political/regulatory forces that impact global marketers; in addition to examining the major multinational market entry strategies. We also explore the task of designing, implementing and evaluating global marketing programs.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 110.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 242 - Advertising

    3

    A survey of advertising and its applications in business and society.  Considered are a historical survey of advertising, regulation of advertising, buyer behavior, advertising agencies, advertising media, copy layout, and campaign management.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 240


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    BUS 271 - Financial Accounting Indepedent Study

    1

    A continuation of Financial Accounting for students who have transferred a 3 credit Financial Accounting course from another institution.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Chemistry

  
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    CHE 121 - Introduction To Chemistry

    4



    The basic principles of chemistry, including metric measurement, properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and solutions, with emphasis on the usefulness of the periodic table in predicting chemical behavior. Designed primarily for students with no previous chemistry courses. The laboratory includes an experimental study of the chemical principles. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

     ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 131 - College Chemistry I

    4



    The fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry including the physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, redox reactions, and chemical equilibria. The laboratory includes an experimental study of the chemical principles. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): Science majors, pre-med and engineering transfer students should take CHE 151 for their General Chemistry requirement.

    Note: This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 132 - College Chemistry II

    4

    A systematic study of the structures, nomenclature, physical properties, and chemical reactions of the classes of organic compounds, progressing to a study of biochemistry and the compounds of life: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The laboratory includes an experimental study of the chemical principles. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CHE 131 with a C or better.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 151 - General Chemistry for Engineering and Science I

    4



    A comprehensive general chemistry course intended for students planning to continue in chemistry, biology, or engineering. Topics include atomic theory, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, liquids and solids. Appropriate for science majors and engineering transfer students. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; eligible for MAT 195; and completion of high school or college chemistry in the last five years.
    General Education Elective(s): Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 152 - General Chemistry for Engineering and Science II

    4

    A continuation of CHE 151. Principle topics include kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, solubility, electrochemistry, and some organic chemistry. Appropriate for science majors, engineering transfer and pre-med students. The laboratory includes an experimental study of the chemical principles. 3 hour lecture/3 hour laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CHE 151 and MAT 195, both with a C or better.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 160 - Principles Of Biochemistry

    4

    A practical investigation of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the study of the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, biological membranes, and major metabolic pathways. This course will couple the traditional study of biological chemistry with standard laboratory procedures commonly utilized in modern biotechnology industries. 3 hours lecture/3 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Certificate in Biotechnology or permission of the course instructor.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 251 - Organic Chemistry I and Lab

    4



    This course studies the chemistry of hydrocarbons and their derivatives.  Topics include: nomenclature, conformations, reactions, mechanisms, and physical properties.  Other topics investigated are stereochemistry, substitution and elimination reactions and mechanisms.  Spectroscopy including infrared, mass spec, nmr and UV-vis will be studied.  Laboratory includes classical techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds as well as modern techniques of analysis.


    Learning Outcomes :
    - Use the vocabulary of chemistry, both language and mathematical, to explain concepts.
    - Explain the structure and reactions of organic molecules base on modern bonding theories.
    - Analyze composition and structure of organic molecules with the aid of instrumental analysis.
    - Communicate the concepts and results of experiments through effective writing and oral communication skills.
    - Utilize safe and course-appropriate laboratory techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CHE 152 with a C or better
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CHE 252 - Organic Chemistry II and Lab

    4



    This course is a continuation of CHE 251.  Topics include aromaticity and aromatic reactions. Nomenclature, structure, reactions, mechanisms and physical properties are studied for the following hydrocarbon derivatives: alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, acids, amines, and macromolecules. The laboratory experience uses instrumentation for the structural analysis of molecules.


    Learning Outcomes:
    - Use the vocabulary and models of chemistry - both language and mathematical, to explain concepts appropriate to the course content.
    - Explain the structure and reactions of organic molecules base on modern bonding theories.
    - Analyze composition and structure of organic molecules with the aid of instrumental analysis.
    -  Communicate the concepts and results of experiments through effective writing and oral communication skills.
    - Utilize safe and course-appropriate laboratory techniques.
    - Discuss the phenomenon of toxicity as it relates to organic molecules and the responsibility of science and health science majors to contribute to the green chemistry global initiative.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CHE 251 with a grade of C or better.
    General Education Elective(s): Science


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Clinical Laboratory Science

  
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    CLS 101 - Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science

    3

    This course is intended to provide the student with an overview of the medical laboratory. Topics include the history of the field, hospital and laboratory professional organizations, state and federal regulations, and careers in the clinical setting, in research and in industry. The role of the medical laboratory scientist in the clinical setting will be explored further through examination of each laboratory department.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CLS 102 - Basic Clinical Laboratory Theory and Techniques

    4

    This course is designed to introduce the theoretical principles and applications of diagnostic techniques and the procedures of the clinical laboratory including phlebotomy. It will define and describe qualitative and quantitative, manual and automated laboratory techniques, particularly in hematology. The laboratory portion of the course is designed to expose prospective clinical laboratory assistants to many of the essential skills, methods, and procedures basic to professional performance in the clinical laboratory, to explain and demonstrate to students and have them perform these methods; to develop an understanding of these techniques and to provide a technical background, an approach to testing that the student can build upon and use in future courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CLS 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Communications

  
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    COM 101 - Introduction to Communication Media

    3



    This course provides a framework for understanding the impact of media on society and the individual.  The history, organization, economics, theories, and social significance of communication media are surveyed. Special emphasis will be given toward the evolving media environment, how to evaluate media messages, and how to become a better consumer of the media.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental elements of the communication process.
    • Generate quality responses that summarize significant events in the development of each form of media surveyed.
    • Develop and apply skills in media literacy and critical media analysis.
    • Analyze the media’s role in shaping society, along with our role in shaping the media.
    • Describe the importance of media communication now and in the future.
    • Predict the issues facing the future of media.
    • Appraise the ethical and philosophical issues that arise within the media landscape and the various viewpoints this includes.

     

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Critical Thinking, Multicultural and Global Perspectives, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities, Social Science
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 102 - Media Ethics

    3



    This course examines the responsibilities of media makers and the ethical issues facing decision-makers in all fields of communication. Students critically examine ethical principles and analyze case studies that focus on ethical dilemmas.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Critically appraise ethical dilemmas within the context of media.
    • Analyze and write about media in terms of ethical and moral implications.
    • Discuss ethical dilemmas with others in a way that is both respectful and productive.
    • Apply ethical concepts of truthfulness, intellectual honesty, accuracy, sensitivity, fairness, balance, and transparency in resolving an ethical dilemma.
    • Develop and articulate personal, ethical and moral beliefs from the perspective of a media maker.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Social Responsibility, and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core curriculum General Education Requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 103 - Public Speaking and Professional Presentations

    3



    This course presents basic commuincation skills required for effective composition and delivery in both public speaking and professional presentations.  Students engage in creating, delivering, and evaluating informative and persuasive speeches including extemporaneous and impromptu delivery.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Construct effectively organized, audience-centered, and professionally delivered oral presentations for informative and persuasive context using proper source documentation.
    • Gather and analyze the reliability and validity of print and electronic sources for building credibility in oral presentations.
    • Apply ethics and civility such as avoiding plagiarism, citing sources orally, developing tolerance for difference of opinion, and evaluating evidence and arguments when constructing and delivering oral presentations.
    • Execute oral presentations with verbal and nonverbal fluency in extemporaneous, impromptu and public reading delivery methods.
    • Report increased self confidence in oral ciommunication skills for interpersonal, group, and public settings.

    ISLOs: This course supports student development of Written and Oral Communications, Social Responsibility, and Personal and Professional Development.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities
    Note(s): This course has been approved to meet the Core Curriculum General Education requirement.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 104 - Foundations of Media Production

    3



    This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the terminology and theoretical concepts of media production. Students learn and apply technical skills through the production of media projects. These experiences establish a foundation for subsequent media production courses.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply the production process when creating media projects.
    • Develop and write basic media production proposals, scripts and storyboards.
    • Integrate compositional and artistic theories into media productions.
    • Record and edit still photographs, audio and video using a variety of production tools and software programs.
    • Collaborate with classmates to organize and produce media projects.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of media production.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

     

     

     

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 105 - Introduction to Short Film Production

    3



    This course provides an introduction to short film theory and production techniques. Working with HD video, students develop fundamental film production, direction, and editing skills. The course requires students to work both collaboratively and individually.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Critically articulate the history, theory, and current practices of film production.
    • Demonstrate competency in digital film production.
    • Demonstrate competency in film editing.
    • Produce digital film projects, following the stages of the production process.
    • Collaborate with classmates to design and produce film projects.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of film production.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.


    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 106 - Introduction to Film Studies and Analysis

    3



    This course introduces students to language of film analysis (mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound), as well as the elements of film form and narrative structure. Additionally, students are exposed to a broad overview of the historical developments and social implications of the medium.

     

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Use film-specific language to critically evaluate and analyze the technical and artistic merits of a film.
    • Draw relationships between a film and contemporary society.
    • Discuss the role of film in society and culture in a way that is both respectful and productive.
    • Write an effective and coherent film analysis.

     

     

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 107 - Public Relations

    3



    The course examines all facets of public relations including media relations, market research, community relations and integrated communications strategies that include linking public relations with advertising, social media and special events.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Create and produce news releases, pitch letters, reports and brochures, as well as harness new and emerging online and social media tools.
    • Promote and defend a brand’s image and reputation.
    • Collaborate with classmates to address PR challenges and opportunities through the creation and presentation of strategies and campaigns.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of public relations.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

     

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 109 - Reporting and the Internet

    3

    This course introduces students to the new world of “citizen journalism”. Citizen journalism has been described as news “for the people and by the people.” In this course students will acquire a working knowledge of blogs, podcasts, discussion groups, forums, e-lists and other Internet communication tools and will explore how these are reshaping the media world. Students will use the knowledge they have acquired to create and contribute to a class blog. Internet news outlets such as the “hyper-local” backfence.com and citizen rated news will be explored and examined. This course is especially useful for students interested in journalism and its future, and those that enjoy the Internet.

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 110 - Screenwriting the Short Film

    3



    This course provides students with a working knowledge of the challenges and techniques inherent in writing the short film script. Discussion points include plot, character, conflict, dialogue, genre, and structure with the intent to enhance writing workshop and critical skills.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Analyze both short and feature film scripts in terms of storytelling principles - act structure, plot, scene construction, character arc, tone, mood and theme.
    • Pitch a film script idea.
    • Write a log-line, beat sheet, and treatment for a screenplay.
    • Correctly format a narrative film script.
    • Develop and write a script for a short film.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of screenwriting.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 115 - Introduction to Human Communication

    3

    This course examines the elements affecting oral communication at the individual, small group, and public communication levels with emphasis on the practice of communication at each level.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible of ENG 101
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 121 - Introduction to Digital Video Production

    3



    In this course, students are introduced the theories and practice of digital video production. Working with digital video equipment and software tools, students develop fundamental video production and editing skills. The course requires students to work both collaboratively and individually.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Critically articulate the history, theory, and current practices of digital video production.
    • Demonstrate competency in digital video production.
    • Demonstrate competency in video editing.
    • Produce digital video projects, following the stages of the production process.
    • Collaborate with classmates to design and produce media projects.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of digital video production.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 122 - Radio Programming

    3

    An introduction to how radio stations are programmed, including various formats and the duties and responsibilities of program, news, promotion, and public affairs directors, air talents, and sales personnel. Students will practice how to speak well, and learn how to deliver commercials, public service announcements, news, music, and sports.

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 123 - Introduction to Digital Audio Production

    3



    In this course, students are introduced the theories and practice of digital audio production. Working with digital audio equipment and software tools, students develop fundamental audio production and editing skills. The course requires students to work both collaboratively and individually.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Critically articulate the history, theory, and current practices of digital audio production.
    • Demonstrate competency in digital audio production.
    • Demonstrate competency in audio editing.
    • Produce digital audio projects, following the stages of the production process.
    • Collaborate with classmates to design and produce media projects.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of digital audio production.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 124 - Media Writing

    3



    This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques needed to gather and organize information for the purpose of media writing. Students learn the fundamentals of purpose, context, voice, technique, and structure for effective writing for various forms of media, including print, broadcast, and online.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply information-gathering and effective listening techniques, including interviewing.
    • Use professional stylebooks and guides to format writing for a particular media.
    • Make distinctions in content of various types of media writing.
    • Write content for a variety of media.
    • Articulate ethical, legal, and copyright issues related to writing.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of media writing.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 125 - Social Media

    3



    This course introduces students to the contexts and forms of social media. Students become familiar with a range of social media tools, analyze and discuss their uses and implications, and develop hands on participation literacy.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss the history of Social Media and the most current platforms.
    • Evaluate and compare the appropriateness of social media tools for particular uses.
    • Identify and analyze current social media issues and controversies.
    • Create and curate social media content.
    • Build professional networks and a personal brand using social media tools.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of social media.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 127 - Introduction to Crisis Communications

    3



    This course will teach students how to evaluate high profile crises that negatively impact the reputation of celebrities, politicians, corporate brands and organizations and the tools and strategies needed to defend those being investigated or attacked by the news media, special interest groups or government officials.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Conduct a vulnerability audit to identify potential challenges to an image and reputation crisis.
    • Develop a crisis communications plan and multidisciplinary team to address the event.
    • Work with print, broadcast and social media during highly public and stressful events.
    • Issue timely and credible information to employees and other stakeholders.
    • Coach spokespeople on the tough questions that they may be asked by the media during the crisis.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of crisis communications.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 150 - Introduction to Journalism

    3



    This course covers the fundamentals of reporting, writing, and producing news stories for print, broadcast, and online media. Students develop news writing skills for a variety of media platforms, including traditional and new journalism.

    After completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Examine and implement reporting strategies for print, broadcast and online news
    • Write a hard news story in inverted pyramid style and modified inverted pyramid style.
    • Write a compelling feature story.
    • Cover a geographic or community beat, developing and producing a story in text, audio, and video.
    • Apply rules for copy editing, headline writing, photo selection and page layout (digital and print).
    • Articulate the news cycle and develop skill in handling breaking news.
    • Consider ethical implications and apply ethical decision making in the field of journalism.
    • Critically reflect on professional practice.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENG 101.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 201 - Journalism II

    3

    Building on the principles learned in Introduction to Journalism, this course gives students practice in handling multiple sources and breaking stories. It also provides advanced work in interviewing and writing under deadline pressure, as well as experience in copy editing, headline writing, photo selection and page layout. Opportunity to apply skills to a college publication will be available for interested students.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 and COM 150.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 203 - Journalism Internship for the Print Media

    3

    Upon completion of COM 150, Introduction to Journalism, students may apply to take a 120-hour internship at one of several print media facilities within commuting distance of the MCC campuses. Each student will work with a journalism faculty member for the duration of the internship as well as an editor. An Internship Request Form must be submitted to the Communications Chairperson for approval at least three weeks prior to the end of the semester preceding the beginning of the internship. Students will be expected to keep a weekly log of their activities and maintain a portfolio of all their published work. This internship will afford the students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience as a practicing news reporter or photographer.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of COM 150.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 221 - Communication Internship

    1



    The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge they have developed in the classroom to a real-world experience with the support of both a faculty adviser and a professional in communication field. Interns will spend 2 hours per week at their internship position and attend a weekly one-hour seminar at the college. Students will be assessed using an evaluation from their internship site coordinator, as well as an e-portfolio which will include weekly memos, self-reflections, written assignments, and projects undertaken for the internship.

    Students will be able to:

    • Engage in professional behavior when working in the communication industry.
    • Understand and appreciate diversity and be sensitive to the needs of others.
    • Evaluate and analyze the culture of a workplace.
    • Reflect analytically on their contributions to an organization.
    • Apply communication theory and skills in a real world communication environment.
    • Expand on their ability to work independently or in a team.

    ISLOs:

    This course supports the MCC Institutional Student Learning Outcomes of Written and Oral Communication, Critical Thinking and Personal and Professional Development.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of COM 104 (Foundations of Media Production) and completion of 30 credits in the communication degree program with a GPA of 2.0 or higher.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 222 - Communication Internship

    2



    The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge they have developed in the classroom to a real-world experience with the support of both a faculty adviser and a professional in communication field. Interns will spend 5 hours per week at their internship position and attend a weekly one-hour seminar at the college. Students will be assessed using an evaluation from their internship site coordinator, as well as an e-portfolio which will include weekly memos, self-reflections, written assignments, and projects undertaken for the internship.

    Students will be able to:

    • Engage in professional behavior when working in the communication industry.
    • Understand and appreciate diversity and be sensitive to the needs of others.
    • Evaluate and analyze the culture of a workplace.
    • Reflect analytically on their contributions to an organization.
    • Apply communication theory and skills in a real world communication environment.
    • Expand on their ability to work independently or in a team.

    ISLOs:

    This course supports the MCC Institutional Student Learning Outcomes of Written and Oral Communication, Critical Thinking and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of COM 104 (Foundations of Media Production) and completion of 30 credits in the communication degree program with a GPA of 2.0 or higher.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    COM 223 - Communication Internship

    3



    The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge they have developed in the classroom to a real-world experience with the support of both a faculty adviser and a professional in communication field. Interns will spend 8 hours per week at their internship position and attend a weekly one-hour seminar at the college. Students will be assessed using an evaluation from their internship site coordinator, as well as an e-portfolio which will include weekly memos, self-reflections, written assignments, and projects undertaken for the internship.

    Students will be able to:

    • Engage in professional behavior when working in the communication industry.
    • Understand and appreciate diversity and be sensitive to the needs of others.
    • Evaluate and analyze the culture of a workplace.
    • Reflect analytically on their contributions to an organization.
    • Apply communication theory and skills in a real world communication environment.
    • Expand on their ability to work independently or in a team.

    ISLOs:

    This course supports the MCC Institutional Student Learning Outcomes of Written and Oral Communication, Critical Thinking and Personal and Professional Development.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of COM 104 (Foundations of Media Production) and completion of 30 credits in the communication degree program with a GPA of 2.0 or higher.
    General Education Elective(s): Humanities


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Computer Aided Design

  
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    CAD 100 - Exploring Computer Aided Design

    3

    Discovering the world of Computer Aided Design (CAD). CAD software is used across many disciplines. Learn the basics of Computer Aided Design with this hands-on course. Various popular and powerful CAD programs will be explored and presented. You will use basic 2 Dimensional, 3 Dimensional and Solid Modeling CAD programs to explore and understand the world of CAD Design. Mechanical and Architectural software tools will be available with demonstration and hands-on use of these tools. Many CAD features and applications will be demonstrated. Drawing, Editing, Visualization and Printing of a real project will be generated. . Basic computer skills are required. No previous CAD experience is necessary.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 101 - Mechanical Drafting I And Lab

    3

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the projection methods, procedures and protocols for graphically translating engineering concepts to mechanical drawings. Course emphasis is on shape description and focuses on orthographic projection principles (ANSI Y14.3M-1999) for multi-views, sectional and auxiliary views and pattern developments; pictorial projection principles (ANSI Y 14. 4M-1994) for isometric, oblique and perspective views; and geometric principles for resolving design problems. Students will also learn industry workplace behaviors required for success. 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory Course only offered in the fall semester.

    Corequisite(s): CAD 115 or permission of CAD instructor.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 110 - Engineering Graphics I

    3

    Primarily using CAD software tools, this course is designed to familiarize students with the projection methods, procedures and protocols for graphically translating engineering concepts to mechanical drawings using both hand sketches and CAD tools. Course emphasis is on shape description and focuses on orthographic projection principles (ANSI Y14.3M-1999) for multi-views, sectional and auxiliary views, dimensioning technique, pictorial projection principles (ANSI Y 14.4M-1994) for isometric, oblique and perspective views; and geometric principles for resolving design problems.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 115 - Introduction To Computer Aided Design

    3

    Introduces students to Computer Aided Design documentation using microcomputer-drafting methods through application of CAD software. Utilizes a tutorial/application approach to introduce CAD concepts. 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory Course usually offered in the fall semester. Students will learn to create multi-view drawings, manage files and plot.

    Corequisite(s): CAD 101 or permission of CAD instructor.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 130 - Engineering Graphics II

    3

    A continuation of CAD 110. Primarily using CAD software tools, this course is designed to provide students practical experiences in the resolution of engineering drawing design problems. This will include the conversion and editing of 2D CAD graphics into 3D CAD features. Theories and principles of shape and size description are developed/reinforced through application of accrued skills on formal working drawing packages. Emphases of the course include: practical implementation of ANSI/ASME Y14.5-1994 dimensioning and tolerancing practices, selection of materials, development of a working knowledge of engineering handbook and catalog specification data, and formulation of weldment drawings.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 110


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 151 - Mechanical Drafting II And Lab

    3

    This course is designed to provide students practical experiences in the resolution of drafting design problems. Theories and principles of shape and size description are developed/reinforced through application of accrued skills on formal working drawing packages. Emphases of the course include: practical implementation of ANSI/ASME Y14.5-1994 dimensioning and tolerancing practices, selection of materials, development of a working knowledge of engineering handbook and catalog specification data, and formulation of weldment drawings, CAD-generated detail and assembly drawings; 2 hours lecture/ 2 hour laboratory. Course usually offered in the spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 101 and CAD 115.
    Note(s): Articulation students may enroll in this course.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 169 - Solid Modeling I

    3

    This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills required to develop three-dimensional CAD solid models. Using feature-based parametric design principles, students will become familiar with the process used to develop and edit 3D solid models and to generate 2D drawings from the model. The creation of parts and assemblies will be explored. Students will employ state-of-the-art computer-aided design software packages such as SolidWorks and Inventor to generate the solid models. 2 hour lecture/2 hour lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of EGR 101 or current enrollment in CAD 110


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 180 - Solid Modeling II

    3

    A continuation of CAD 169 Solidworks I. This course is designed to introduce complex solid geometry using sweeps, curves, planes and several other available options. Bottom Up and Top Down Assembly features will be used for applicable design projects. Hardware assembly for fasterners will be introduced. Sheet Metal Layout, Mold Designs and Finite Element Analysis are some areas to be introduced. Assembly animations and simulations will be used to enhance project evaluations and function. Customization of the user interface for productivity of design features will be also be explored. 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 169


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 205 - Geometric Dimensioning And Tolerancing

    3

    Introduces industrially accepted dimensioning and tolerancing concepts as they affect engineering, production and quality control processes to provide economic and technical advantages. The standard for dimensioning and tolerancing practices, ASME Y14.5-1994, is used to discuss principles of datum referencing symbology tolerances of position, form and runout functional gauging conventional dimensioning techniques. This standard is also a component of the ISO 9000 quality standard. 3 hour lecture

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 130 or CAD 151


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 207 - Electro-mechanical Layout/Computer Aided Design

    3

    This course will teach industrial practices used to generate an electrical drawing package. The industrial standards ASME Y14.5, 14.5A and Y32.2 are applied to the generation of several types of electronic drawings: Mechanical Detail, Sub-Assembly, Assembly, Schematic, Cable, Connection Diagram, Parts List and Wiring List. Computer programs of Power Logic, Power PCB and AutoDesk’s AutoCAD will be used; 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory. Course usually offered in the fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 151; completion of CAD 129 or CAD 143.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 220 - PCB/Electro Mechanical Layout

    3

    This course will teach industrial practices used to generate an electrical drawing package. The industrial standards ASME Y14.5, 14.5A and Y32.2 are applied to the generation of several types of electronic drawings: Mechanical Detail, Sub-Assembly, Assembly, Schematic, Cable, Connection Diagram, Parts List and Wiring List. Computer programs of Autodesk’s products and Solidworks will be used as design tools. This course will also provide the basic information and experience necessary to layout double-sided and multi-layered printed circuit boards using state of the art design tools (POWER PCB and Power Logic). 2 hour lecture/2 hour laboratory. Course usually offered in the Fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 227 and CAD 180 or CAD 151
    Note(s): Open to CAD students.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 225 - Solid Modeling III

    3

    A continuation of  CAD 169 and CAD 180, this course is designed to use CAD Solid Modeling tools to further enhance the principles of mechanical drafting and design. All projects and designs will incorporate all the advanced features studied in CAD 180 to simulate engineering designs. Students will incorporate advanced dimensioning practices and analysis into their designs. The government standard, Dimensioning and Tolerancing per ASME Y14.5-1994 will be used throughout the course and will be reflected in the design drawings. Solid modeling software, utilizing feature-based parametric design, will be employed to generate mechanical models, assemblies, and detail drawings. 2 hour lecture/2 hour lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 130 and CAD 180 or CAD 151 and CAD 169


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 227 - CAD Applications

    3

    This course will focus on advanced AutoCAD features. Enhanced software from AutoDesk, and Architectural Desktop will be used as the primary design software. This will include 3D Drawing using wideframe, surface and solid modeling techniques and 3D Walkthrus. Also, customizing features that can enhance CAD performance. Advanced project/design management techniques will also be introduced using Microsoft Office Applications. Students will be required to apply these features to their engineering discipline. 2 hours lecture/ 2 hours lab. Course usually offered in the fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 110 and CAD 169 or CAD 115


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 228 - Practicum In CAD Technology

    3

    This capstone course will simulate an industrial design environment where CAD drafters and designers work on team projects, communicate verbally and in writing with peers, superiors, and clients or vendors and develop and practice collaborative and intra/interpersonal skills. Included is a comprehensive project in which the students interact with the CAD faculty instructors in the process of developing various segments of the project in which students develop complete sets of working drawings and assemblies to industrial dimensioning and fabrication standards, and document and prepare materials for presentations to colleagues, and superiors. Solid modeling will be employed. Various oral and written assignments such as project plans, progress reports, and a final report are required. 2 hour lecture/4 hour laboratory. Course usually offered in the spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 225 and CAD 227.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 230 - Architectural CAD

    3

    Introduces students to the concepts of using CAD for preparing architectural drawing packages, floor plans, elevations, wall sections and presentation drawings using AutoCAD Architectural Desktop and Revit Architecture to develop architectural working drawings for residential or commercial structures. Topics in the course include walls, doors, windows, stairs, roofs, annotation, symbols, elevations, column layouts, ceiling rids and model viewing.  Previous knowledge of 2D AutoCAD drawing and editing commands is required. 2 hour lecture/2 hour lab

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAD 227 and CAD 130 or CAD 101


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAD 270 - Design for Manufacturing

    3

    This course will study the major principles for designing a quality, cost-efficient product by creating designs that employ the best cost and manufacturing processes. Topics include design for manufacturing, design for assembly, process selection in manufacturing, inspection planning, concurrent engineering product re-engineering, quality management. The focus is on engineering designs and system approaches that affect cost quality, cycle time, and maintainability.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 110 Engineering Graphics II and CAD 169 Solid Modeling I


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Computer Applications

  
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    CAP 100 - Computer Essentials

    3

    This course is designed to provide students with basic technical skills in word processing, spreadsheets and PowerPoint using Microsoft Office 2007 software. Students will also learn keyboarding skills, computer concepts, Windows XP, navigating the Internet and communicating by e-mail. There will be a strong study skills component throughout the course. In addition, students will learn the following: communication skills, organizational skills, team contribution and leadership, critical thinking, decision making, problem solving, information and resource management and self-directed and continuous learning. These skills will be acquired through a project-based learner-centered environment. Students will also develop a portfolio showcasing their skills, abilities and accomplishments.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 101 - Computer Applications

    3



    Provides the general knowledge and skills needed to operate computers for academic, professional, and personal use, with an introduction to the major software tools: word processing, spreadsheets, data management, and presentation graphics. The course also covers computer concepts, managing and storing files, and using the Internet for research and communications

     

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099; and placement above or concurrent enrollment in Math Module 5.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 103 - Computers for Technology

    3

    An introduction to computer applications including word processing, database, and spreadsheets with special emphasis on science and technology applications. Students will learn to use spreadsheets to organize, graph, and analyze data. A brief introduction to the Internet and to computer on-line measurements is included.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 154 - Word Processing Applications

    3

    Students learn how to produce a variety of documents and reports using the computer industry’s leading word processing software. Covers fundamental through advanced-level word processing concepts and techniques, with an emphasis on editing, formatting and layout. Students taking this course should have a basic familiarity with PCs and a basic proficiency with keyboard (touch typing skill not required).

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of BUS 105 or CAP 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 155 - Spreadsheet Applications

    3

    Intended for students and professionals who wish to become proficient with the microcomputer as a problem solving tool. Through demonstration and hands-on computer exercises, students apply spreadsheet to such areas as budgeting, loan analysis, and business graphics.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAP 101
    Corequisite(s): MAT 070 or completion of Modules 1-8 in Preparation for College Math
    Note(s): Specific configurations of hardware and software may vary by campus.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 156 - Database Applications

    3

    Through demonstration and hands-on computer exercises, students are introduced to relational database concepts. Using Microsoft Access, students will create databases and then learn to extract and present information through the use of queries, forms, and reports. Students will also learn to create and use macros and modules.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CAP 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CAP 158 - Introduction to Video Games

    3

    Learn about video game technology and the processes by which they are created. Topics include storyline, fundamental building blocks, game play, graphics and user interface models. The course is for artists, programmers, gamers, designers, or anyone wanting to know more about the technologies and skills that make up their favorite video games. Information on how to break into the video games industry, multiplayer/tournament gaming, and human computer interaction is also covered.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Computer Science

  
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    CSC 101 - Introduction To Computer Science

    4

    Introduction to programming using Visual Basic, an object oriented/event-driven language. The course emphasizes planning and then creating interactive Windows applications. Projects will include the use of dialogue boxes and toolbox objects such as label, textbox, checkbox, listbox, command button, frame, and picturebox. The coding of procedures and functions will incorporate standard programming techniques such as declaring variables, implementing loops and decision constructs.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 101; and placement above or completion of MAT 080 or completion of Math Module 12 or 82.
    General Education Elective(s): General Education


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 108 - Introduction to Video Games

    3

    Learn about video game technology and the processes by which they are created. Topics include storyline, fundamental building blocks, game play, graphics and user interface models. The course is for artists, programmers, gamers, designers, or anyone wanting to know more about the technologies and skills that make up their favorite video games. Information on how to break into the video games industry, multiplayer/tournament gaming, and human computer interaction is also covered.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENG 099.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 151 - Programming I

    4

    In this course, the fundamental constructs of a programming language will be explored in concepts such as: memory, algorithms, data types, operators, simple input/output processing, sequential processing, decision structures, repetition, functions, arrays, and pointers. Course content will be delivered using the C++ programming language.

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 290 or completion of CSC 101 with a C or better and eligible for Math Module 82.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 156 - Operating Systems Basics and Security

    3

    This course provides students with the elementary knowledge necessary to navigate, administer, and secure the Linux operating system. The way in which the Linux and Windows operating systems perform tasks will be compared and contrasted to facilitate the learning of operating system and security concepts. Topics discussed in this course include: file system management and utilities; access control; mail facility; pipes, redirection and filters; text editor utilities; permissions; basic shell scripts and process management. Students will install, manage, and secure the Linux environment through hands-on exercises and course projects.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CSC 101, CSC 151, or NST 165.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 170 - Digital Forensics I

    3

    Formerly Computer Forensic I

    This course introduces students to several areas in the field of digital forensics. Students will learn the principles, procedures, and techniques used in digital crime investigation. Through an introduction to basic legal concepts and evidentiary procedures for investigating criminal activity involving computers and other digital devices, students in this Digital Forensics course explore the practical application of law and legal procedures in the digital age.  Students will write reports and prepare digital evidence to assure admissibility in court.
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    - Discuss the legal and ethical issues related to the acquisition and analysis of digital evidence, particularly as it relates to evidentiary and constitutional requirements.
    - Properly conduct a digital forensic investigation.
    - Describe a variety of digital forensic analysis tools
    - Write reports and prepare digital evidence to assure admissibility in court.
    - Set up a digital forensics lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENG 101 with a C- or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 188 - Introduction to Computer Security

    3

    This course covers the fundamentals of computer systems security.  A student who successfully completes this course will be able to describe basic security concepts, controls, mechanism, and analysis techniques.  A student who successfully completes this course will also be able to identify and describe the fundamental security concepts including:  security policies, access control models, vulnerabilities, and threat models, and apply them to basic security controls and tools including: firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems, and monitoring tools through hands-on exercises and projects.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 151 and CSC 156, both with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 202 - Computer Organization/Assembly Language

    4

    Formerly CSC 201

    An introduction to binary and hexadecimal number systems, machine language and machine architecture. Assembly language topics include the assembly process, arithmetic, comparison, addressing modes, input/output , branching, repetition, procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 252 with a C or better AND eligible for ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 252 - Programming II

    4

    This programming course emphasizes object-oriented design. Topics include class construction, data abstraction, inheritance, overloading, overriding, exceptions, encapsulation, static classes and polymorphism. Students use an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to create applications in Java.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 151 with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 255 - Programming III

    4

    Formerly CSC 253

    This course emphasizes advanced object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts in Java C++ including interfaces, exception handling, event handlers, graphics classes, graphical user interface, and multithreading.  OOP concepts and development in Java and C++ will be compared.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 252 with a C or better AND eligible for ENG101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 258 - Data Structures

    4

    Formerly CSC 257

    An introduction to data structures and algorithms. Topics include lists, stacks, queues, trees,  graphs, and sorting, searching and hashing algorithms.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 255 with a C or better AND eligible for MAT290 AND eligible for ENG 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 272 - Digital Forensics II

    3

    Formerly Computer Forensics II

    This course continues the study of Digital Forensics with emphasis on the tools used by investigators to acquire and analyze data.  Through hands-on laboratory exercises, students will learn how to use computer forensics software and other tools while working with both Windows and Linux operating systems.  Students will examine the digital forensic information as it relates to both civil and criminal investigations. 
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    - Analyze digital evidence using FTK Imager, FTK Toolkit and Registry Viewer.
    - Appropriately use Linux tools such as SleuthKit, Autopsy and Volatility.
    - Define and describe components of different operating systems and file systems.
    - Prepare digital evidence reports for both civil and criminal cases.
    - Take the ACE (Access Data) certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 170 with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 273 - Digital Forensics III

    3

    In this course, students study the methods and software and hardware tools used to retrieve data from mobile phones.  Topics include the retrieval and examination of hidden and deleted data, including SMS messages and emails, as well as the hand-held body itself and the memory cards used with these devices.   Additionally, introductory concepts of network forensics will be presented with emphasis on understanding network traffic and various ways information regarding that traffic can be gathered.
    Learning Outcomes :
    - Students will become proficient with Access Data Mobile Phone Examiner.
    - Students will be able to describe how to investigate e-mail crimes and violations.
    - Students will be able to explain the basic concepts of handhelds device forensics
    - Students will be able to explain the basic concepts of mobile device forensics
    - Students will be able to describe procedures for acquiring data from cell phones and mobile devices.
    - Students will learn how to communicate effectively through verbal presentations and written reports.
    - Students will be offered the opportunity to sit for the Access Data MPE certification exam.
    - Students will be introduced to tools such as network sniffers and packet capture software.

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment or completion of CSC 272 with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 289 - Secure Programming

    3

    This course covers the fundamentals of software vulnerabilities and secure programming concepts.  A student who successfully completes this course will be able to describe software vulnerabilities, apply secure coding practices, perform vulnerability analysis, and perform software security testing.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of CSC 188 and CSC 252, both with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    CSC 290 - Information Assurance

    3

    This course covers the fundamentals of secure use, processing, storage, and transmission of information.  A student who successfully completes this course will be able to describe, deploy, and configure basic cryptography, risk management, security controls, compliance, and incident response.  The student will also be able to identify and apply the three concepts of information security: confidentiality, integrity, and availability through hands-on exercises and projects.

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or completion of CSC 257, CSC 289, and MAT 290, all with a C or better.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Computer, Software and Network Technology

  
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    NST 101 - Principles of Electric Circuits

    4

    An introductory course in electricity/electronics. DC/AC circuit analysis, units of measurement, electrical components, concepts of voltage, current, impedance, and power, energy and relationships between them are covered. Also covered are Ohm’s Law; Kirchhoff’s laws; series and parallel circuits; Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, Superposition; and resonance. Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, and others are practiced. 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of or current enrollment in TMA 095, or TMA 075, or MAT 080, or completion of modules 1-12 in Preparation for College Math, or placement above MAT 080.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 111 - Digital Systems Fundamentals

    3

    This course introduces combinational and sequential logic circuits, decoders, multiplexers, ripple counters and synchronous counters. Analog-to-digital converters are also studied. Computer software is used to design, verify and implement digital systems at the gate level. Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is used extensively throughout the course. A project is required that gives students the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience in the design of digital systems. Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 121 - Computer Systems Fundamentals

    4

    This course provides a strong foundation in the core fundamentals of digital technology and is designed to familiarize students with basic computer architecture and operating systems.  The relationships between hardware and operating systems will be explored, as well as computing environments such as networks, virtualization, the cloud, and the data center.  Basic concepts are reinforced by exercises and hands-on applications.  Students will also program and run simple macros in Linux shell.  3 hours lecture/2 hour laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of or concurrent enrollment in NST 111 or ITC 101.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 181 - Networking I

    3

    This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of Local Area Networks (LAN). The fundamentals of network topologies, network administration, information security and data communications are included. Hands-on projects give the student practical applications of classroom theory. Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 2 hours lecture/2 hours lab

    Prerequisite(s): Eligible for MAT 080, Math Module 70 or 80.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 221 - Embedded Computer Systems

    4

    The course covers the architectures of various PICs and microcontrollers, CPUs, registers, addressing modes, parallel and serial I/O. The course emphasizes working with embedded operating systems, device drivers and system communication. The students will learn to tailor embedded operating systems for specific embedded applications, use simple communication protocols including device drivers to connect the microcontroller to a system and to design embedded systems. Laboratory projects will provide students with hands-on work to reflect real-world applications. Employability skills, such as problem solving teamwork, communication, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NST 165 and NST 171.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 231 - Networking II

    3

    This course is a continuation of Networking I, with emphasis on network security concepts.  The course will cover network operating systems, secure network administration, routing and switching, and security aspects specific to wireless networks.  Also included are installation, configuration, and administration of enterprise networks.  Principles of network management; network resources such as print servers, back-up and disaster recovery topics; and advanced topics such as voice over IP, VPN, and optical networks will be discussed. Employability skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communications, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 2 hour lecture/2 hour laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NST 181


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 235 - Advanced Networking

    4

    This course provides advanced level understanding of network technology with emphasis on network security concepts. It will also cover network operating systems, routing and switching, and security aspects specific to wireless networks. Installation, configuration, and administration of enterprise networks will also be included.  Principles of network management; network resources such as print servers, back-up and disaster recovery topics; and advanced topics such as voice over IP, VPN, and optical networks will be discussed.  Employability skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communications, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. Students are expected to have access to a computer with internet outside of class as there is a major web component to the course.
    A student who successfully completes this course will be able to:
    -Describe network protocols and assign devices to first three layers of OSI reference model
    -Install, Configure and test enterprise networks including Windows and Linux
    -Install network operating systems at access layer of networks and make them work with network control mechanisms of DHCP, DNS and network management tools.
    -Plan and perform recovery backups in SAN/NAS
    -Install and configure VOIP SWR/HWR
    -Install, Configure and test enterprise networks including Windows and Linux
    - Install network operating systems at access layer of networks and make them work with network control mechanisms of DHCP, DNS and network management tools.
    -Describe VPN and configure it in the lab environment
    -Explain the Methods used to secure Networks at deferent layers.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: NST 181 or approval from instructor.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 250 - CSNT Capstone Project

    4

    This course requires students to integrate principles, theories, and methods learned in courses required throughout the CSNT Program. Students creatively analyze, synthesize, and evaluate learned knowledge in a project having a professional focus and communicate the results of the project effectively at a professional entry level. The course culminates with the actual construction and demonstration of the project. Design teams report progress to the design supervisor periodically. Students are required to write a technical paper, orally present it, and generate a technical manual for the project. Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 3 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NST 165, NST 171, or NST 241; or department permission.


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 281 - Computer Network Security I

    3

    This course will emphasize basic security concepts (authentication, confidentiality, accounting and integrity), apply these concepts to computer networks, and amplify the theory with hands-on aspects of configuring and using secure networks.  Topics include: review of networking concepts, general security concepts,  user authentication and authorization, encryption, network attacks (including hacking, viruses, worms and denial of service) and network protection.  Defense tools including firewalls, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and filters will be discussed in depth, as they relate to effective and safe e-commerce and other applications in the real world.  Case studies along with projects will be assigned and performed.  Employability skills, such as problem solving, teamwork, personal communication, and critical thinking are integrated into the coursework. 2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NST 181


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

  
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    NST 282 - Computer Network Security II

    3

    This course is a continuation of NST 281, with added emphasis on the configuration and use of secure networks and virtual environments. Topics such as intrusion detection and prevention, disaster recovery and backup, ethical hacking, security benchmarks and models, risk/change and privilege management, and computer forensics are discussed. Applications are drawn from contemporary computing systems, including virtual environments and storage. Laboratory exercises, case studies and projects will be an integral part of this course. Employability skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communication and critical thinking are woven into the course work.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of NST 281


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.


Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 100 - Law and Order

    3

    Every society has both formal and informal means of requiring people to follow its rules. This course examines the criminal justice system and other mechanisms we rely on in the United States to discourage people from engaging in socially unacceptable behavior. Current events and related topics will be used to explore the role and impact of public attitudes, political forces and social institutions on maintaining order in a diverse society. In dealing with this material, students will use analytical and creative thinking strategies, and sharpen their skills in reasoning, problem solving and factual analysis.

    Corequisite(s): ENG 092


    Click here for course schedule details, to register for this course, or to view required books for this course.

 

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